19TH HOLE: The readers take over

May 24, 1959

ROW, ROW, ROW YOUR BOAT BACKWARD UP THE STREAM
Sirs:
Look at what my old friend Herblock, cartoonist of the Washington Post, has gone and done!

Either he thinks the Russians invented backward rowing or, judging by the backwash, they are rowing against the fiercest tide ever and have already outstripped the capitalistic shell, which would not fit the caption.

What does Herblock say?
FRANCIS BRENNAN
New York City

•Herblock says it was one of those days and no one caught the mistake before or after the cartoon got into print.—ED.

BASEBALL: SCOUTS ON THE CAMPUS
Sirs:
In the past, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED has always been willing to enter into a controversy when an abuse arose in the world of sports. We feel that such an abuse exists today in the relationship between collegiate and professional baseball, namely, the invasion of the college campus by professional scouts and the subsequent signing of student athletes before they finish their collegiate careers.

A case in point is our alma mater, Holy Cross, where good baseball teams have become a habit over the years. Last year Holy Cross finished third in the NCAA World Series at Omaha. Three of the starters on that team were seniors and graduated after the season. This left many returning veterans to form a nucleus for another good team. Four of these returnees were signed to professional contracts, which terminated their collegiate careers, and a fifth refused substantial offers.

Why should professional teams be allowed to capitalize unfairly on the work, training and efforts of talented college coaches and excellent athletic programs? If it is allowed to continue, the spirit of college baseball will be broken.

This problem no longer exists in college football or basketball. Why let it continue in college baseball?
JOSEPH W. MULLEN JR.
JAMES J. HAGGERTY
Washington, D.C.

BASEBALL: HOLD YOUR BREATH
Sirs:
I would like to congratulate Roy Terrell on his excellent column Down Went the Yankees (SI, May 11). The Indians' start may be, in reality, a false start and one that cannot be expected to continue the entire season. But many San Franciscans are holding their breath, and a slight tingle runs up their spines.

We remember Joe Gordon and his sensational San Francisco Seals team of 1957. In '56 the Seals finished deep down in the depths of second division. Then the master stepped into the San Francisco picture. No one will ever forget his 1957 Seals, and even though San Francisco is proud, very proud of her Giants, the Seals will always have a special place.

Gordon is stepping into the same kind of place in Cleveland that he had in San Francisco. Can he do it again?
DAVE BALL
Los Altos, Calif.

POSITION WANTED
Sirs:
After reading your excellent article on the Patterson-London bout (SI, May 11), I would appreciate your printing the following letter:

Dear Mr. D'Amato:

I should like to apply for the position of Heavyweight Title Challenger to fight against Floyd Patterson at any time that is convenient for you. I am very eager to do this in view of the purse guaranteed for climbing into the ring.

I am a male with no physical defects, weigh 195 pounds and am not a member of any subversive boxing organization. Although I have never boxed, I was co-captain of the swimming team and am good at golf, baseball and ping-pong. I have also started lifting weights. Character references furnished upon request.
ROBERT L. SEVERANCE
Williamstown, Mass.

SPORTING LOOK
Sirs:
Gee, more fashions. 'Nuff said.
JOAN SHEARSON
New York City

Sirs:
I am writing to inquire whether there is a store in Philadelphia which carries the Jane Ford Regatta Collection by Sportmasters. After reading the May 11 fashion story, Sailing into Summer, I knew that at least one wardrobe problem was solved! It is wonderful that there are designers who understand and answer the needs of women who participate in sports, and I, for one, thank SPORTS ILLUSTRATED and Jane Ford.
ELIZABETH R. CAMPBELL
Philadelphia

•Bonwit Teller-Philadelphia has the collection.—ED.

TALBERT: WORD TO THE WISE
Sirs:
Thanks for the great series by Billy Talbert (The Billy Talbert Story, SI, April 20, et seq.). In a day when other sports editors have buried tennis news (How're Pancho and Hoad doing these days? Just try and find out in the newspapers!), the Talbert story was very refreshing.

With a little promotion and common sense I still believe tennis can be resurrected from the grave dug for it by golf. If tennis is ever released from its exclusive straitjacket and put into the hands of the many instead of the few it will regain its rightful spot.

The tremendous success of the pro-amateur golf tournaments while tennis limps along with its decadent system ought to be sufficient word to the wise.
REV. M. LAUREL GRAY
Cameron, Wis.

THE LITTLE MAN FROM EMPORIA
Sirs:
In stating that Archie San Romani Sr. and Glenn Cunningham were from Kansas (PAT ON THE BACK, May 11) the editors of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED were most correct. Both of these great milers competed for schools in the Sunflower State: Cunningham ran for the University of Kansas, San Romani for Kansas State Teachers College of Emporia.

As a boy of 10, back in 1936, I recall a memorable race in the Midwest Olympic tryouts held in the Marquette stadium. San Romani pulled away in the final lap of the 1,500 meters in what appeared to be an upset of Cunningham in the making. But Archie made a fatal misstep, hit the curbing of the backstretch and fell. Cunningham and most of the field passed the prostrate San Romani.

The little man from Emporia pulled himself back into the race to finish second amidst the cheers of the crowd.

Following the race, Cunningham ascended the top step of the victory stand. When San Romani was introduced, Cunningham reached down, took his hand and pulled him to the top step in a magnificent gesture of sportsmanship and recognition of performance.

By the looks of Archie Jr., track fans again will be treated to more of those great San Romani performances.
JIM KING
Athletic News Director,
Marquette University
Milwaukee

PHOTOHerblock—¬© 1959 The Washington Post Co.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)