19TH HOLE: The readers take over

June 14, 1959

RIDING: REQUIRED READING
Sirs:
My wife, my two daughters and myself are keen horseback enthusiasts and we want to congratulate you on having the foresight to publish the horsemanship articles (How to Ride a Horse, SI, May 18, 25). They are most timely and well done. Horseback riding is a wonderful sport for both children and adults. As in the case of boating, all members of the family can participate. Riding teaches children how to handle animals, how to do things for themselves and how to enjoy out-of-door living.
EMILE ALBERT BEROL
Danbury, Conn.

Sirs:
As a galloping grandmother, who keeps her hunters at home, I want to express my approval of Gordon Wright's articles. They are to be standard reading this summer for the young and not-so-young who invade my barn.
MRS. WILLIAM H. LONG
Oyster Bay, N.Y.

Sirs:
I hope that all young riders will clip both articles together so they will always remember the only correct equestrian form.
ERNST MAHLER
Master of Fox Hounds
Tryon Hounds
Neenah, Wis.

Sirs:
Please have an article on jumping soon!
JOAN KEEFE
Wilton, Conn.

Sirs:
This series should be placed on the required reading list for all aspiring equestrians.
G. E. McKISSICK, V.M.D.
Philadelphia

BASEBALL: HEROES SUNG AND UNSUNG
Sirs:
Joe Judge could not bear out my long-held opinion more correctly (Verdict Against the Hall of Fame, SI, June 8). Joe Tinker and Johnny Evers don't deserve a place in the Hall of Fame any more than does Franklin P. Adams who wrote the verses that immortalized them. The records show they weren't even an outstanding double-play combination in their time. Adams was merely bemoaning their effectiveness against the Giants in a single series—certainly a small peg on which to hang a halo of immortality.
GERALD CULLINAN
Washington, D.C.

BASEBALL: TREAD SOFTLY
Sirs:
I noted Walter Bingham's report on the new Senator star, Harmon Killebrew (The Killer Strikes in May, SI, June 1), describing the Killebrews' apartment as "sparsely furnished. There were no rugs." I hope the New England philanthropist who kindly loaned rugs to Washington celebrities may have a few recent returns that could be loaned to the latest Washington hero. I am sure The Killer won't lose his present job at third base.
FRANK J. MILLER
San Francisco

BASEBALL: THE COLLEGE GAME
Sirs:
It seems fairly obvious that there is only one honest way to settle the conflict between college and professional baseball (19TH HOLE, May 25), and that is to eliminate the words amateur and professional as far as baseball is concerned.

To illustrate my point, what was better for all baseball than the Northern League, largely composed of college baseball players, that operated so successfully in Vermont during the late 1930s? A perfect proving ground for the majors, a wonderful outlet for the good college player who wanted a further look at baseball, and great for college coaches.
JOHN C. WILLIAMS
Glens Falls, N.Y.

GOLFINGLY, HARRY SPRAGUE (CONT.)
Sirs:
I rote to Harry Sprague after some of his letters in your mag (Dear Mr. Tabor, SI, May 18, 25). They are intresting.

I rote him pronto about this Herbert Warren Wind fellow whose got his name plastered all over the top of these very good letters about the turniments. I told him I would rite off the bat be suspicious of a guy who uses three (3) names.

For a sample, in the papers they will say—Escaped prisner William James Pratt at large. Considered dangerus and probly armed. They always use the whole three (3) names instead of Jim Pratt or just plain Pratt making him sound respektibal. I rote him to watch out for this fellow's true carachter which is so he can hang with the pros awaiting the first chance to cause some truble but making it look good all the while.

I told him he should take my sujestions for what they are worth which is a lot because people who keep using three (3) names all at once sooner or later will be in the headlines escaping from somewhere.

So far Harry has not rote back but that is not unuzial when you get to be on the staff of a national mag. I will be intrested to get his answer (sp?) and I hope he will be on your staff a very long while because he sure yaks it up like a real pro.
FRANK R. HURLBUTT JR., M.D.
Sausalito, Calif.

GOLF: MUSICAL COMEDY NOTES
Sirs:
I would just like to send my thanks for the wonderful articles by Herbert Warren Wind. I particularly liked his coverage of the Walker Cup at Muirfield (An Everelusive Grail, SI, June 1) and his note on Colonel Evans-Lombe, the secretary there, whom Wind characterized as "Muirfield's musical-comedy secretary, who, not infrequently, as he rides his bicycle relentlessly over the course, will suddenly dart out of nowhere to upbraid a slovenly golfer who has replaced his turf after an iron shot but neglected to replace it so that it is perfectly aligned with the grain of the fairway."

I would like to add one more note on Colonel Evans-Lombe. When I was fortunate enough to play Muirfield several years ago, I asked the colonel about their score card, remarking that it only had the number of the hole and the distance but no par for any of the holes. The colonel gave me a most patronizing look and said, "My dear fellow, we don't have a par at Muirfield—we simply gather here to play golf."
ARTHUR JULIAN
Los Angeles

GOLF: THAT OTHER 59
Sirs:
Here are a few additional things about the 59 I made in the 1938 Northern California PGA championship.

My score was more sensational than Snead's (That Incredible 59, SI, June 1) because I was always a once-a-week golfer—twice in one week and I was overtrained! In my morning round of the tournament I had finished with three straight birdies; then in the afternoon 12 birds and six pars for a 59—15 birdies on 21 consecutive holes played. The next day under similar conditions I didn't get a birdie until the 18th hole—an easy par-5!

Official course records have always been recognized when played at stroke play. Mine was made in match play, however. There were no stymies involved, and any putts "picked up" were within inches of the cup. Yes, I made the 59, but I assure you it was quite accidental.

I will be most pleased to play Sam for the title—to be played under my conditions: lying on the ground, back to back!
EARL FRY
Alameda, Calif.

TURF: TRADE REPORT
Sirs:
I certainly want to thank you for the fine article Whitney Tower did on Ribot (A Horse Trade to Make History, SI, June 1); in fact, it was one of the best factual jobs of reporting I have seen in a long "time, and I compliment him and SPORTS ILLUSTRATED for the care in seeing that it was accurately reported.
JOHN W. GALBREATH
Darby Dan Farm
Columbus, Ohio

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)