A roundup of the sports information of the week

July 13, 1959
July 13, 1959

Table of Contents
July 13, 1959

Invaders From Below The Equator
Wonderful World Of Sport
  • The Queen's Plate is a Canadian horse race first run 100 years ago in honor of Queen Victoria, who was not greatly amused at the time. Last week nobody at Toronto's Woodbine track watched with keener interest than Victoria's great-great-granddaughter

An Analysis in Depth
Race Track Business
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

A roundup of the sports information of the week

TENNIS—World tennis took on distinct Latin-American look after Alex Olmedo, transplanted Peruvian who helped U.S. win Davis Cup, wrung men's title from Australia's Rod Laver 6-4, 6 3, 6-4 and Maria Bueno, perky Brazilian schoolmarm, overpowered America's Darlene Hard 6-4, 6-3 for women's crown at Wimbledon.

This is an article from the July 13, 1959 issue

BOXING—The law began to peck away at boxing's hoodlums, plunked one of the worst behind bars in New York. Gabe Genovese, who comes by his reputation honestly (his buddy is Frankie Carbo; his cousin is reputed Mafia Chief Vito Genovese), was sentenced to two years in jail for operating as undercover manager of Lightweight Ludwig Lightburn in 1956. Among other items in the assistant D.A.'s recitation of his misdeeds: shaking down co-managers of Former Middleweight Champion Carmen Basilio for $51,000 (see page 34).

BOATING—Harvard's unbeaten sweepswingers turned Thames into their own private playground, stroking off with Royal Henley Regatta's two most prized awards. Crimson heavyweights outdistanced the Thames Rowing Club by nearly three lengths for Grand Challenge Cup; lightweights beat University of London by 2½ lengths for Thames Challenge Cup.

Canada's Miss Supertest III, trailing Miss Bardahl on points going into the final heat, bounced to victory in Detroit Memorial Regatta after a wall of water washed out Seattle boat. Miss U.S. I sank in the first heat (see below) when supercharger broke loose, tore hole in bottom of the craft.

HORSE RACING—While Chicago's Bon Lindheimer dreamed about staging match race between Round Table and Hillsdale, racing's two best handicap horses were busy adding to their fortunes. At Washington Park, Oilman Travis Kerr's Round Table burst down stretch to take Stars and Stripes Handicap in U.S. record time of 1:47 1/5 for mile-and-eighth, lifted his lifetime winnings to $1,452,639. At Hollywood Park, C. W. Smith's bargain-basement Hillsdale came off pace to run down game old Find by half length in $53,650 American Handicap, now has $447,345 tucked away.

Amid pageantry befitting presence of royalty, Jockey Bob Ussery steered home E. P. Taylor's New Providence in $77,300 Queen's Plate at new Woodbine course in Toronto, stepped up to receive congratulations from Queen Elizabeth. Observed country boy Ussery: "She's a very nice girl."

TRACK & FIELD—U.S. stars, their ears perked for news from Moscow where Russians easily outclassed rivals from seven other Communist nations, were given little reason to worry. Performances were generally mediocre, except for 6-foot 11½-inch high jump by Soviet's Igor Kashkarov.