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How to cure hitting from the top

July 13, 1959
July 13, 1959

Table of Contents
July 13, 1959

Invaders From Below The Equator
Spectacle
Wonderful World Of Sport
  • The Queen's Plate is a Canadian horse race first run 100 years ago in honor of Queen Victoria, who was not greatly amused at the time. Last week nobody at Toronto's Woodbine track watched with keener interest than Victoria's great-great-granddaughter

An Analysis in Depth
Race Track Business
Baseball
Food
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

How to cure hitting from the top

Most errors in golf are caused by hitting from the top and coming into the ball from outside the line. Proper coiling and uncoiling will prevent this. Most average golfers, however, don't have a clear picture in their minds as to what they should be doing to get into position on the backswing. Their hands and club move in one direction, so consequently they are never in a position to make a coordinated inside-out downswing with the club, hands, arms and body fused together. Quite the reverse, in fact. At the finish of the backswing, in a poor position which permits them no balance or feel, they have to hit from the top. This they do by moving the right shoulder and arm to the outside, for, although this is a wrong source of power for golfers to use, it is the only one they can summon.

This is an article from the July 13, 1959 issue Original Layout

Developing a proper coil on the backswing with the hands, arms and body working together is not the easiest thing in the world for average golfers. The best short cut I have found is getting them to picture and feel that their heels remain in the same position from the time of address until long after the ball is contacted. If they can remember this, it is remarkable how quickly the entire pattern of their swing changes and they start building a good swing which delivers maximum speed at the bottom of the arc, and from the inside.

JOE KNESPER, Mayfield CC, Lyndhurst, Ohio

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