Men: WE WIN 132-104 Women: WE LOSE 41-66

Scoring at the meet (5,3,2,1) helps the weaker team, since the entrant finishing fourth and last is automatically credited with a possibly undeserved point. But this will not prevent victory for either our men or the Russian women. Here, says Tex Maule, is the probable order of finish in each of the 32 events
July 19, 1959

100 METERS
One of the eternal verities of sport is that the U.S. continues to breed wonderful sprinters. Latest—one of the best—is Ray Norton, the panther-muscled U.S. champion. His high-speed, floating finish should nip Poynter, lose Ozolin and Bartenyev.
U.S. 8-3

200 METERS
Norton's overdrive, which picks up ground quickly in the closing yards, makes him even tougher at 200 meters. The Russians start well, but they can't match Norton or Vance Robinson at top speed. Norton, Robinson well ahead, then Bartenyev, Konovalov.
U.S. 8-3

400 METERS
Southern's sprint speed, fine kick puts him ahead all the way. Dave Mills, young and inexperienced, can ghost behind Southern for second. The Russians' Grachev a rather distant third and the veteran Ignatyev close to him in fourth. U.S. all the way.
U.S. 8-3

800 METERS
Tom Murphy, a muscular, thoughtful Irishman, has learned to add his wonderful finishing sprint to a hard early pace and is now one of the world's best. Jerome Walters, on a fine, feathery stride, second, ahead of Russians Krivosheyev and Savinkov.
U.S. 8-3

1,500 METERS
Never pick a neophyte in international competition because of the tension involved. But Dyrol Burleson is a rare neophyte. His great strength and a fluid stride should shade capable Jim Grelle, who will hustle to beat Soviet's Sokolov and Momotkov.
U.S. 8-3

5,000 METERS
Dellinger, a thin, intense and relentless runner, gives the United States unaccustomed strength in this race. His strong finish, on top of sustained pace, puts him first, trailed by Russia's Bolotnikov, Artynyuk. Steiglitz, tall, strong, a close fourth, even third.
U.S. 6-5

10,000 METERS
The United States, long a laggard at distances over a half mile, hasn't quite caught up yet. The Russians—fast-finishing Hubert Pyarnakivi and Aleksey Desyatchikov—have times two minutes better than Max Truex or Bob Soth. Max may press them.
U.S.S.R. 8-3

20-KM. WALK
The Russians, with their odd bent-over style, far outclass the U.S. entry in the walk. Vladimir Golubnichy and Anatoli Vedyakov are the best walkers and would be a cinch in the 5 o'clock train rush. Golubnichy, then Vedyakov, our Haluza, Timcoe.
U.S.S.R. 8-3

110-M. HURDLES
Calhoun, with the essential speed for a short race and incomparable hurdling technique, may trail for a few hurdles against Hayes Jones's rocket start. After that, it's Calhoun ahead enough over the last hurdle to hold off Jones. Mikhailov third, Bezerutsky.
U.S. 8-3

400-M. HURDLES
Dick Howard, who upset world-record holder Glenn Davis, has improved rapidly, looks capable soon of breaking 50 seconds. Davis, out with a lame back, will be replaced by Josh Culbreath, but the Americans should still be one-two over Klenin, Lituyev.
U.S. 8-3

STEEPLECHASE
A very grueling race, the steeplechase, because it is included in few American meets and no one likes to run it, is all Russia. Semyon Rzhishchin and Sergei Ponomarev should win as they please, ahead of Americans Phil Coleman and George Young.
U.S.S.R. 8-3

POLE VAULT
Don Bragg's speed and his power make him the best vaulter in the world. He reacts well to competition, may set a world record here if the runway is good. Ron Morris has speed and courage but the Russians—Bulatov second, Petrenko third—are improving.
U.S. 6-5

JAVELIN
Al Cantello, who gets more out of his approach than nearly any other javelin thrower, needs a fast track. Given that, he should win handily. Vladimir Kuznetsov, around 250 this year but capable of over 270, second, then Tsibulenko and U.S.'s Buster Quist.
U.S. 6-5

HIGH JUMP
In an event in which technique plays a major part, the Russians are very consistent, very good. Charley Dumas, U.S. champion, on a good day can beat either Russian. But, on consistency, Igor Kashkarov first, Dumas, Shavlakadze, Errol Williams.
U.S.S.R. 7-4

BROAD JUMP
The sine qua non of international competition is the ability to rise to an occasion, possessed in full measure by Greg Bell. Russia's 26-footer—Igor Ter-Ovanesyan—has it too, but not enough spring. Bell. Ter-Ovanesyan, Joel Wiley, Fedoseyev, in that order.
U.S. 7-4

400-M. RELAY
The world's best sprinters need fear no one, and it's the United States, going away. With Hayes Jones to fill out the team of Norton. Poynter and Robinson, the U.S. could drop the baton and win—nearly. Here, again, is a strong chance of a world record.
U.S. 5-3

1,600-M. RELAY
Even with Glenn Davis missing, the United States should have no trouble. Eddie Southern, Dave Mills, Jack Yerman and Dick Howard rank among the best quarter milers in the world and the Russians can't match any one of them, let alone the four.
U.S. 5-3

HOP, STEP, JUMP
Here yet again is an event which is—no pun intended—a stepchild in U.S. track meets. The Russians rank among the world's best. Both Fedoseyev and Tsigankov are better than the two Americans—Ira Davis and Herman Stokes. Fedoseyev may set a record.
U.S.S.R. 8-3

100 METERS
Popova's quick burst from the blocks puts her out in front, but long-legged Wilma Rudolph just might pass her at the tape. Only a fingernail's difference will separate them. Tenacious Lucinda Williams should shoulder her way past Vera Krepkina to take third.
U.S.S.R. 6-5

200 METERS
Still smarting from the surprise licking she took at the Moscow meet. Isabelle Daniels has buckled down to work. She's perfected her relaxed but powerful finishing kick and now can come in under 24. Teammate Williams should sneak past the Russians.
U.S. 8-3

SHOTPUT
Last year in Moscow the Russians added to their considerable documentation on Parry O'Brien's style. Despite that, they can't touch the old master, nor one of his disciples, Dave Davis. Vartan Ovsepyan is the better Russian, but not good enough.
U.S. 8-3

800 METERS
Russian women are the old hands at this distance, the Americans still very green. Muscular Yanvaryova and Shvetsova will play tag, then make a simultaneous dash for the finish, leaving Lillian Green and Grace Butcher still back at the turn into the homestretch.
U.S.S.R. 8-3

400-M. RELAY
Precision-trained in the art of baton passing and used to running together, Tennessee State's quartet of Rudolph, Williams, Jones and Hudson will romp far away from the U.S.S.R. team. In the process they may well establish a world record at Franklin Field.
U.S. 5-3

DISCUS
Al Oerter, who gets tremendous distance from his controlled spin, ranks well ahead of the Russians, but O'Brien, doubling in discus and shot, may have trouble finishing second. Oerter by a couple of feet, then Vladimir Lyakhov, O'Brien and Otto Grigalka.
U.S. 7-4

80-M. HURDLES
Russia's Bystrova, with perfect form, is in a class by herself and should easily top teammate Galina Grinvald. Neither Shirley Crowder nor Barbara Mueller has mastered the continuous flowing motion which gives the illusion of floating over the barriers.
U.S.S.R. 8-3

HIGH JUMP
One of the few women in the world who can jump higher than her own head (5 feet 7 inches), Taisiya Chenchik has only Galina Dolya to worry about. No hard competition from the Americans, Ann Roniger and Ann Flynn, who will bow out at 5 feet 3 inches.
U.S.S.R. 8-3

HAMMER THROW
At one time the hammer throw was as esoteric an event as the steeplechase in America, but no longer. Now Harold Connolly, with a lightning-fast spin, holds the world's record. The Russians—Rudenkov and Krivonosov—are two and three, Backus four.
U.S. 6-5

BROAD JUMP
Consistently over 20 feet. Shaprunova will leap for a world record. Versatile Krepkina will have trouble outdistancing Margaret Matthews if Maggie gets her dander up. The youthful Annie Smith will have to take a back seat to her elders for this trip.
U.S.S.R. 8-3

DISCUS
Back to defend her Moscow win, the veteran Nina Ponomareva, consistent in her lightning-fast turns, will win. Earlene Brown has to keep the pressure on to beat back Evgenia Kuznetsova's challenge, as Pamela Kurrell finishes in a very distant fourth spot.
U.S.S.R. 7-4

DECATHLON
With Rafer Johnson unable to compete because of an injured back, Vasily Kuznetsov must be reckoned an easy victor. Dave Edstrom, the No. 2 man for the U.S., can squeeze by Russia's Bukhantsev; NYU's Mike Herman, new to the decathlon, cannot.
U.S.S.R. 7-4

SHOTPUT
The biggest shock the Russians got last year was Earlene Brown's victory in the shotput. Not to be caught napping this year, too, the Russians are sending the 194-pound Tamara Press. Press could win with an explosive 56-foot try. Zhdanova can take Shepherd.
U.S.S.R. 7-4

JAVELIN
Thoroughly trained in the complicated run-up of the javelin, both Birute Zalagaitite and Alevtina Shastitko are world class. Each can throw the javelin 25 feet farther than Marjorie Larney or Amelia Wood, two New York City girls, who lack top coaching.
U.S.S.R. 8-3

PHOTORAY NORTON
United Stales
PHOTORAY NORTON
United States
PHOTOEDDIE SOUTHERN
United States
PHOTOTOM MURPHY
United States
PHOTODYROL BURLESON
United States
PHOTOBILL DELLINGER
United States
PHOTOH. PYARNAKIVI
U.S.S.R.
PHOTOV. GOLUBNICHY
U.S.S.R.
PHOTOLEE CALHOUN
United States
PHOTODICK HOWARD
United States
PHOTOS. RZHISHCHIN
U.S.S.R.
PHOTODON BRAGG
United States
PHOTOAL CANTELLO
United Slates
PHOTOI. KASHKAROV
U.S.S.R.
PHOTOGREG BELL
United Slates
PHOTOVANCE ROBINSON
United States
PHOTODAVE MILLS
United States
PHOTOOLEG FEDOSEYEV
U.S.S.R.
PHOTOGALINA POPOVA
U.S.S.R.
PHOTOISABELLE DANIELS
United States
PHOTOPARRY O'BRIEN
United States
PHOTOL. SHVETSOVA
U.S.S.R.
PHOTOWILMA RUDOLPH
United States
PHOTOAL OERTER
United States
PHOTOGALINA BYSTROVA
U.S.S.R.
PHOTOTAISIYA CHENCHIK
U.S.S.R.
PHOTOHAROLD CONNOLLY
United States
PHOTOV. SHAPRUNOVA
U.S.S.R.
PHOTONINA PONOMAREVA
U.S.S.R.
PHOTOVASILY KUZNETSOV
U.S.S.R.
PHOTOTAMARA PRESS
U.S.S.R.
PHOTOB. ZALAGAITITE
U.S.S.R.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)