As many a tourist will testify, an ocean voyage is a pleasant and relaxing way to get to England. But when Skipper Richard Nye sailed his 53-foot yawl Carina across an angry Atlantic it was anything but relaxing. The crew came aboard at Newport, R.I. expecting a leisurely passage, only to find Nye in a hurry to get to England for the traditional summer sail race from Cowes to Fastnet Rock and back to Plymouth. With the determination of a Captain Bligh he mapped a northerly course past Newfoundland, which was having its worst year for ice since 1937. This disturbed Nye not a bit—he had always wanted to see an iceberg firsthand.

On the run to St. John's harbor, Newfoundland, Nye saw his first iceberg, and many more that swirled out of the mist. Once at St. John's, reports came in of a tropical storm working its way up the coast. Rather than wait it out, Nye headed Carina back into the mist for England. After four days the fog lifted and the barometer dropped. Nye stuck to his course, and Carina rolled, heaved and slammed her way through shouldering seas. At sunset on the 11th day, with dolphins to greet them, they sighted The Lizard, rocky outpost of England. With an average daily distance of about 182 miles, it was a record crossing for a boat Carina's size.

PHOTONORRIS HOYTDENSE FOG SHROUDS A SEA-POUNDING 'CARINA' DURING RUN TO NEWFOUNDLAND, FIRST STOP ON HER VOYAGE TO ENGLAND PHOTONORRIS HOYTICEBERG PASSES ASTERN AS CREWMAN JOHN BARNEY TESTS THE WATER TEMPERATURE. ICE FLOES WERE A SERIOUS THREAT
PHOTONORRIS HOYTBEFORE STORMY SAIL FROM ST. JOHN'S, DICK NYE SIGNS GUEST BOOK AT CROW'S NEST AS HOST DAVID STAMPTON LOOKS ON TWO PHOTOSNORRIS HOYTAFTER RECORD PASSAGE OF 10 DAYS, EIGHT HOURS, 'CARINA' IS GREETED BY TEAM OF PLAYFUL DOLPHINS AND LIZARD SUNSET
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)