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GAME 3: 92,294 PEOPLE AND ONE FURILLO

Oct. 12, 1959
Oct. 12, 1959

Table of Contents
Oct. 12, 1959

World Series
Thundering Herd
Spectacle
Pro Football
Ducks
Horse Show
Automobiles
How To Beat Snead
  • A hacker named Harry settles down in his den and, aided by a bottle of brandy and a clear memory of his best strokes, faces Ol' Sam on TV—and licks him. You can try the same thing Saturday, when Sam meets Gary Player in the first match of the 1959-60 All-Star series (ABC-TV, 5 p.m. E.D.T.)

19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

GAME 3: 92,294 PEOPLE AND ONE FURILLO

The Dodgers beat Chicago in the third game the way they beat the Giants and Braves all year, by attrition. The Dodgers let the White Sox punch them until the White Sox were worn out. It is not the easiest way in the world to win a baseball game, but it seems to work for Los Angeles.

This is an article from the Oct. 12, 1959 issue Original Layout

In every inning, the White Sox managed to collect at least one hit, and sometimes two. Occasionally they added a walk, and once a hit batsman. Don Drysdale, the Dodger starter, was behind almost every batter. The Dodger bullpen looked like a picnic of ants. At the same time, Los Angeles was doing nothing with Dick Donovan, a slow-moving, quick-talking fellow who may have invented the slider. In the first six innings Donovan allowed only one Dodger hit, and he walked not a man. He struck out five and everyone else seemed to hit the ball into the ground.

But Drysdale, despite all the hits and walks, was tough when he had to be, and when things were the toughest he had Relief Pitcher Larry Sherry to bail him out. Defensively, the Dodgers were superb; they made some brilliant catches, they made no mistakes, they pulled off three double plays, and they had John Roseboro, the strong-armed catcher. The speed of this Chicago team is legend, but in the third game, the frustrated White Sox tried four times to steal and three times Roseboro threw them out.

"That's what I've been waiting for," said Don Zimmer, assistant shortstop and head cheerleader of the Dodgers. "For them to go-go and for Roseboro to gun them out."

"I hope," said Manager Al Lopez of the Sox, "that Roseboro doesn't change our thinking."

As for their offense, the Dodgers saved their strength for one big effort. In the seventh, Neal hit a line single into the screen, the second hit off Donovan. Larker walked and Hodges walked, to fill the bases. Lopez took Donovan out and brought in Gerry Staley to pitch. Manager Walt Alston sent in Carl Furillo to bat. Furillo hit a hard ground ball between Aparicio and second base, the kind of play that Aparicio makes every day of the week. Only it was Sunday and the ball took a hop over his glove and two runs scored. "In the second game," said Alston, who doesn't particularly look like a genius, "I used Essegian because I needed a home run. Today I needed a single, so I used Furillo."

The White Sox, who in the first inning had filled the bases with one out and then failed to score, filled the bases again in the eighth. They scored this time, once, but on a double play that wrecked the rally. A pop fly followed to end the inning and the Dodgers were home free. They added another run in the eighth on Neal's double and stopped the White Sox cold in the ninth to win 3-1.

"I thought that it was a hell of a ball game," said Lopez. "We were lucky to win," said Alston.

PHOTOSHOUTING, SHRIEKING, HORN-BLOWING, WHISTLE-TOOTING MOB OF 92,294 WATCH DODGERS' DRYSDALE PITCH TO CHICAGO'S APARICIO IN FIRST WORLD SERIES GAME PLAYED IN CALIFORNIA. CENTER FIELD SEATS IN ROW 79 ARE 700 FEET FROM HOME PLATEPHOTOANCIENT HERO for Los Angeles is Carl Furillo, a Dodger since 1946. His extra-inning hit helped win pennant playoff; his two-run single won third game of Series.