Waterfowl hunters, who often find their best sport in the worst weather, have been trying for generations to keep warm and dry in duckblinds. Most of them, like the hunter shown below left, solved the problem by burying themselves under mountains of clothing. They usually managed to stay warm, but they weren't always comfortable or able to swing at a fast-flying bird. Add to this the weight and bulk of hunting gear—a wood blind that took time to build and was cumbersome to move, two dozen decoys, a shotgun and case, shells, binoculars and a hefty retriever—and it becomes clear that the average hunter needed a truck or a porter to get into the field. Today all this is changed. Synthetic materials and insulation have lightened and streamlined the hunter's clothing; light alloy metals have taken 34 ounces off his gun and binoculars, and a portable aluminum frame has replaced the wood of his blind. The result is that this season all the gear needed on a duck hunt—including blind and decoys—can be packed into a single duffel bag and weighs a total of 43 pounds 4 ounces. In fact, only the man, the dog and the shells weigh the same as they did a decade ago. But this isn't all the good news. Besides greater warmth and flexibility with little or no bulk, the 1959 waterfowler will find his lightweight gear costs considerably less ($376 compared to $642) for considerably more comfort.

muff with hand warmer

9 OZ.

(9) Saks Fifth Ave. cotton-suède shirt

1 LB.

(10) Flannel-lined nylon gun case

6 OZ.

(11) Suède leather shooting gloves

3 OZ.

(12) U.S. Rubber insulated-foot hip boots

7 LBS. 8 OZ.

(13) Hodgman Plast-A-Ply waterproof pants

1 LB. 2 OZ.

(14) Hodgman Plast-A-Ply waterproof duck-hunting parka

12 OZ.

(15) Labrador retriever

75 LBS.

(16) Porta aluminum-frame portable duckblind

8 LBS.

Total:

118 LBS. 4 OZ.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)