BASEBALL: HOW WELL I REMEMBER
Sirs:
As one who occupied a press-box seat throughout that 1919 World Series between the Cincinnati Reds and the Chicago White Sox and one who is familiar with events that followed, may I correct Roy J. Conley of Raleigh, N.C. (19TH HOLE, Oct. 5).

The third paragraph of Mr. Conley's letter states:

"In 1920 Speaker and Gandil had a fight at first base, and if ever a man got what was coming to him it was Gandil...."

I regret to advise Mr. Conley that he did not witness such a fistic encounter, Speaker vs. Gandil in 1920.

Chick Gandil did not play with the Chicago White Sox in 1920.

After that 1919 World Series, Gandil took it on the lam, so to speak, bowing out of baseball for a secluded spot in the distant West.

John Collins, in 117 games, and Ted Jourdan, in 46 games, were the first basemen for the Chicago White Sox in 1920.
SID C. KEENER
Director, National Baseball
Hall of Fame
Cooperstown, N.Y.

BASEBALL: OPEN SEASON
Sirs:
I wonder if the Yankee or Yankees who did most "to destroy the myth of Yankee invincibility" might be included in Mr. Kochivar's Venomous Venison Venture for the Detroit Tigers (EVENTS & DISCOVERIES, SI, Oct. 5). It seems to me that anyone who watched the Yankees play must admit they themselves were a contributing, if not a deciding factor, in the '59 debacle.

However, as a long loyal Yankee-phile, may I further suggest (if a Yankee or Yankees were chosen) that to the nonresident Montana game limit which now reads one elk, one deer, one mountain goat and one grizzly or one brown bear, there be added one Kochivar. One Albert Kochivar.
NED WELSH
Kanab, Utah

BASEBALL: WAIT TILL NEXT YEAR
Sirs:
Two good marks and a huzzah for the fine story turned in by your two Marks, Harris and Simont—Love Affair in San Francisco (SI, Sept. 28). Harris certainly caught the pitch of the spirit that pervaded the Bay area up until the black weekend when Mr. K. from Moscow and the Dodgers from L.A. arrived in this great city. It is rumored that what few cheers Mr. K. received when he passed through the streets, were developed by the use of a sign (out of camera range) flashed by someone in his entourage, which read "We'll Win It on the Road." The Cubs blew this hope sky-high.

For the past month or so, a newly arrived tourist would have thought that half of the people in San Francisco were deaf and forced to the use of hearing aids. The sale of pocket-size transistor radios was terrific, as no well-dressed San Franciscan would be without his radio when the team was playing either at home or on the road, and he carried his electronic aid to the opera or opening night of a stage show. Well, as they used to say in Flat-bush, "Wait till next year." A sign at the 49ers-Eagles football game on Sunday read, "The Giants were too young and the 49ers are too old."
FRANK J. MILLER
San Francisco

Sirs:
As a heartbroken Giant fan, I must thank you for your September 28 issue. Your humorous and accurate articles on the National League pennant and World Series have injected a few laughs and fond memories into my otherwise sad and gloomy fall.
JEANNE E. DICKSON
Alleghany, Calif.

BASEBALL: THE ADMIRAL AND THE MAYOR
Sirs:
As a sort of semipro scribbler myself, I must say that Gerald Holland did a swell job of spinning a coherent and readable yarn out of incidents that were related only by the fact that they involved one guy, with a hell of a big assist from his granddaughter and his pen pal, Morgan (Viva the Admiral, Fanàtico Grande!, SI, Sept. 7).

I sent the copy of the magazine to the mayor of San Juan, Doña Felisa, with the following written on the picture of her pitching the first ball:

"The caption is a classic example of inaccurate reporting! You heaved a perfect, letter-high strike. The only reason I had to jump was because I crouched down too low."
D. V. GALLERY
Rear Admiral, USN
San Juan, P.R.

FOOTBALL: THE BIG BIG TEN
Sirs:
Thank heaven the Oklahoma football myth has finally been exploded and exposed.

A lot of discerning football fans hope Northwestern's convincing, no, ultra-convincing victory (FOOTBALL'S 2ND WEEK, Oct. 5) will be an enduring lesson to those preseason prognosticators who annually take the easy way out and select Oklahoma as the top team, and to those sports-writers and pollsters who vote Oklahoma as the top team in the country on the basis of their wins against Big Eight-type competition.

This premise will be further borne out in the remainder of the season when Oklahoma again runs rampant against their remaining opponents while Northwestern proves to be only an above-average team in the Big Ten.
DICK DE GUNTHER
Champaign, Ill.

FOOTBALL: COLOR OF THE WEEK
Sirs:
What a great pleasure to see the beautiful color photo of the Navy-Boston College football game (SI, Sept. 28). It is, without reserve, one of the finest color football photos I have ever seen, and congratulations are most certainly in order to you and to your staff.
EDWARD G. HUDOCK
Bethlehem, Pa.

FOOTBALL: HERS AND MAYBE HIS
Sirs:
We spent two hours reading your 1959 Football Issue (SI, Sept. 21) and picked 18 out of 20 winners to win the Lapeer county Press football contest (see below). We missed one game by two points, and there was one tie.

We could never have done it without your very informative issue featuring the scouting reports. Thank you.
MRS. DALLAS AVERY
Almont, Mich.

IN THE FAMILY
Sirs:
Congratulations on the splendid picture of Carroll Shelby (Denim Driver, SI, Sept. 28). His record over the past few years is further vindication of your 1956 selection as Sports Car Driver of the Year.

As co-winner of the toughest one of them all, Le Mans, Carroll would, I am sure, be the first to give some credit to the Aston Martin he drove to beat another Aston Martin for his great victory.

Regards from a proud Aston Martin owner.
JOHN B. MESSINGER
Clearwater, Fla.

PHOTOMRS. AVERY SCORES
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)