19TH HOLE: The readers take over

January 04, 1960

GOLF CARTS: PHOOEY!
Sirs:
In anticipation of the tremendous profits I expect to receive when my new golf cart hits the market (The Golf Cart Is Here for Good, SI, Dec. 14) I am preparing my resignation from the U.S. Navy. The distinguishing feature of this otherwise conservative design—the built-in bar is functional and nothing out of the ordinary—is an automatic, spring-loaded club-swinger which can be set for any distance from five to 300 yards—the latter for self-styled long hitters. This device, if used properly, will not only eliminate the excessive muscular fatigue associated with swinging the club manually but will also speed up play, since preliminary waggles, shakes and twitches will no longer be necessary before each shot. A noted golf pro expressed the philosophy which led me to this design with the question: "Would you close your screen door by hand when you could buy a spring to do it automatically?" Phooey!
LIEUT. COMMANDER BOB MOORE, USN
China Lake, Calif.

Sirs:
The golf cart, in my opinion, is nothing more than a manifestation of a dissipated, sedentary and obese country gradually eating and sitting itself out of existence. There is no doubt that literally thousands of physically handicapped individuals can now play golf with the use of the cart, but there is also no doubt in my mind that this group is a very small minority and that the majority of the people now using carts would be immeasurably better off if they walked and used nature's method of transportation.

Even though I feel Mr. Wright attempted to show the obvious harm done to our individual physical fitness by eliminating walking 18 holes of golf, I feel he actually did a disservice to the youth fitness movement by not stating unequivocally that you had better get off your seat and on your feet and get the physical exercise needed to reach your optimum degree of efficiency, regardless of what endeavor you might seek.

There is no telling how many people Claude Harmon influenced with his statement: "Most people get too much exercise playing 18 holes of golf anyway. I tell you the cart is here for good, and a darn good thing it is, too. Believe me, I never want to walk again when I can ride." What am I supposed to tell my five sons when they ask to ride a golf cart while playing 18 holes?
BOB COX
Executive Director
Youth Fitness Commission of North Carolina
Raleigh, N.C.

•Cart or no cart, Bob Cox, star end and place-kicker at the University of North Carolina in the years of Charlie (Choo Choo) Justice, is also past president (1958-59) of the U.S. Junior Chamber of Commerce, and should tell his sons to keep heads down, pivot and not break their wrists.—ED.

Sirs:
Gentlemen, let's play down any effort to get people interested in any more automation than there is already.
DAVID A. HENRY
State Director of Youth Fitness
West Virginia Jaycees
Fairmont, W. Va.

Sirs:
The spectacle of all those "sports" chugging over the fairways in their motorized symbols of American athletic debility is hardly edifying. Undoubtedly, we will next see bowling buggies to carry the kegler from his seat to the foul line or perhaps croquet carts for motoring between wickets.
ROBERT D. LILLIBRIDGE
San Bernardino, Calif.

Sirs:
Mr. Harmon's rotund figure was displayed for all television viewers to see during the National Open in 1959, and I was completely amazed that he could walk 18 holes. Too bad that USGA rules 1 do not permit the use of golf carts, because walking is evidently too strenuous for him.

It is certainly an appalling sight to see young men and women, the picture of health, riding in golf carts, with some excuse that they're too tired or in too much of a hurry to walk 18 holes. I think perhaps former President Harry S. Truman was right when he showed grave concern over the physical fitness of our young people.
ROBERT J. NICKELS
Ann Arbor, Mich.

•Wrong President. It was Dwight D. Eisenhower who showed grave concern over the physical fitness of our young people.—ED.

Sirs:
I am afraid I shall have to agree that "the golf cart is here for good." The reason that I regretfully admit this is because I am a caddie in southern California.
RICHARD HALLICK
Palos Verdes Estates, Calif.

Sirs:
A true golfer enjoys the walk as much as any other part of the game. Down with carts!
J. M. JEWELL
Columbus, Ind.

BASKETBALL: CONGRATS AND REGRETS
Sirs:
Congratulations are in order to Jeremiah Tax for his detailed work in preparing the College Basketball Preview (SI, Dec. 7).

It is certainly an excellent and accurate report on a wonderful sport.
DAVID H. STRACK
Basketball Coach,
University of Idaho
Moscow, Idaho

Sirs:
I was very much pleased that the University of Toledo was recognized.
ALAN FELLHAUER
Maumee, Ohio

Sirs:
Your college hoop-court scouting committee has failed to mention New England's small college champs for three years, St. Michael's. Representing the Northeast for the last two years in the NCAA National Small College Tourney, they finished second in 1958 and lost to the tourney victor last year.
JOE ROWAN
Winooski Park, Vt.

HOCKEY: SELF-IMPROVEMENT
Sirs:
In my opinion, every week SPORTS ILLUSTRATED has at least one article which alone is very well worth the price of the magazine.

The Dec. 14 issue has two such articles: Sebring: This Is My Last Chance and The Violent Skills of Ice Hockey.

It was very interesting to me how Tony Brooks explained the Sebring race and the complicated point-scoring system.

The hockey article interested not only me but my friends, who all live in the country and wouldn't think of putting on a pair of ice skates unless there was a hockey stick at hand. These tips will prove of great value to us who play hockey on our pond.
DAVID M. SMITH
Washington, Pa.

CLIMBING: GLAD YOU ARE THERE
Sirs:
I would like to express our deep personal gratitude to the men of Seattle's Mountain Rescue Council (PAT ON THE BACK, Dec. 7). Like all other climbers in Washington's high Cascades and Olympics, we know that these devoted men are our safeguard against disaster. That it can happen to anyone, any time, is shown by the fact that at least one Mountain Rescue volunteer, trained to the teeth in Alpine safety procedures, has lost his life in the mountains.

The group has no organized means of support, paying for equipment and lost time out of their own pockets. Will you please see that the enclosed small check reaches its destination?
NAME WITHHELD
Bellingham, Wash.

•Indeed we will.—ED.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)