MEN'S SINGLES

A dazzling display of jumps and spins will win a gold medal for three-time world champion David Jenkins
February 15, 1960

Few skaters even attempt and none can match the free-skating achievements of a 23-year-old medical student from Colorado Springs named David Jenkins. An exciting, acrobatic skater, Jenkins will probably be beaten in the precise school figures by Teammate Tim Brown of Sacramento, but in the leaping, whirling free figures like the triple loop jump shown here, he is peerless. To begin this spectacular maneuver, Jenkins works up speed, then brings it under control with a series of quick turns (1, 2 and 3) which also start the wind-up process. The tighter he winds and the harder he presses down on the ice (4), the greater his upward thrust when he releases that pressure. At the instant of explosive take-off (5), all parts of his body coordinate in one great upward push. The skating leg bursts from its compressed position to act as a thrusting lever, the free leg rises (6) and, together with the right shoulder and head, leads the turning action. Approaching the peak of the jump (7), Jenkins snaps his arms in toward his chest and crosses his legs (8) to keep maximum control of his rapidly whirling body. On the descent (9) he checks his spin by flinging out his powerful arms, then unhooks his legs before gently landing (10) and gliding off into a graceful spiral (11).

ILLUSTRATIONM. J. HODGESTHE TRIPLE LOOP
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ILLUSTRATIONM. J. HODGES DIAGRAMSolid line shows tracing on ice, dotted line indicates skater's path in the air.
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HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)