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THE QUESTION: Would the three-bounce rule make tennis a more interesting game for the spectators?

March 21, 1960
March 21, 1960

Table of Contents
March 21, 1960

Yesterday
Negro Ballplayer
Spectacle
Cow Palace
Richard
Baseball
Basketball
Tip From The Top
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

THE QUESTION: Would the three-bounce rule make tennis a more interesting game for the spectators?

GEORGE E. BARNES
President USLTA
Chicago
I'm not sure. Changing to the three-bounce rule might make tennis a lobbing game. Maybe there are other ways of stimulating more action. Softening the ball could do it. There's also the one-bounce rule which would stop the "kill" after a soft return of a hard serve. We must experiment and study with care.

This is an article from the March 21, 1960 issue Original Layout

TONY TRABERT
Member of Jack Kramer's pro group
Cincinnati
I've played this rule more than the others. It seems too long and drawn out. Two sets against Olmedo took two hours. On the other hand, the big complaint has been against the serve, rush and kill. The "no-rally" makes it monotonous. Polls we are taking show that the majority of spectators still prefer the regular game.

DON BUDGE
1937 and 1938 U.S. champion
New York City
On the contrary, it would ruin tennis. There's nothing wrong with the game that a few good ground strokes couldn't correct. When I played a guy who served and rushed to the net, my first thought was: "Wonderful!" The trouble with the top players today is that they have neglected their ground game.

BEVERLY BAKER FLEITZ
Member, 1959 U.S. Wighlman Cup team
Long Beach, Calif.
The three-bounce rule would make tennis dull because it would lose some of its aggression and spark. I saw the pros try the three-bounce rule. It was good tennis, but only because they were pros, and it wasn't as good as their usual game. Generally, three-bounce tennis would be like ladies' tennis, which I don't like.

WHITNEY REED
Intercollegiate tennis champion, 1959
San Jose State College
I'll go along with the attempts to make tennis more interesting to the spectators, but the three-bounce rule isn't the answer. I am against going after the server and penalizing him. If he wants to risk rushing the net, he should be allowed to do so. A better solution would be to lengthen the service three or four feet.

PANCHO GONZALES
World's professional tennis champion
Los Angeles
No. If the three-bounce rule is adopted, the majority of spectators will insist that the old game be revived because fast, offensive tennis is the most exciting tennis. The three-bounce game is longer and duller at times. If they want to slow the game, they can change from grass to a slower, truer bouncing surface.

SEVEN PHOTOS