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Kansas City ATHLETICS

April 11, 1960
April 11, 1960

Table of Contents
April 11, 1960

Toothpick
Cards
1960 Olympic Basketball Team U.S.
Bally Ache
Scouting Reports
  • Two full major league teams could be fielded from the Los Angeles roster, and there'd still be fine players on the bench. Yet this club will have to be lucky to win the pennant again

  • Red Schoendienst was out last year but even so the Braves were heavily favored to win the pennant. They failed. Now Red is back, there's a fiery new manager and Milwaukee is favored

  • The San Francisco Giants are hungry. Last year they were just about to eat the cake when it was stolen away. Now they are smarter and tougher, as the National League will soon discover

  • Friend, Mazeroski and Skinner are back inform, and the Pirates are dangerous once more. But without real power, they must play near-perfect baseball to rise above fourth this year

  • Slipping steadily since their third-place finish in 1956, the Reds have frantically plugged first one deficiency and then another. Now, at last, they seem to have a sound, solid team

  • Tied for seventh in 1957, tied for fifth in 1958, tied for fifth again last year, the Cubs have been improving. It would seem that this year...but no. The higher you go the tougher it gets

  • The Cardinals have gained in power and the pitching should be improved. But in 154 games an awful lot of baseballs are destined to find their way safely through that leaky defense

  • The Phillies have junked an old, losing club to give their youngsters a chance. This will be no miracle of 1950, but at least the Phils will lose in a younger, more interesting way

  • The Sox won in a weakened league and no one knows it better than Bill Veeck. He has strengthened the attack and made them the team to beat for the first time since 1920

  • A group of pawns on Frank Lane's chessboard came surprisingly close to capturing last year's pennant. Now, having exchanged a few key men, Lane feels he has a winner

  • The old Yankees are dead, and their replacements are not in the same class. This is a sound team but it is far from being a great one and it will need lots of luck to rise above third place

  • Tactical troubles—at shortstop and first base—still plague the Tigers. But the main problem is strategic: how to stir contented also-rans and give the faithful something really to shout about

  • The Red Sox finished in the second division last season for the first time since 1952. Now Jensen is gone and Williams is going, going. It may be a while before the Sox climb back up

  • After several halfway seasons, the Orioles are now fully committed to their youth program. Youngsters have taken over as the old names fade. It will all pay off...someday

  • There's a new optimism in Kansas City. The outfield is solid, the infield and pitching are better, and Hank Bauer has pepped up the whole ball club. Fifth place could be the result

  • A few years ago Washington was a one-man ball club and a last-place team. Things are brighter now. The Senators are still a cellar team but now they have some players people have heard of

Track
Tennis
Motor Sports
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

Kansas City ATHLETICS

There's a new optimism in Kansas City. The outfield is solid, the infield and pitching are better, and Hank Bauer has pepped up the whole ball club. Fifth place could be the result

The baseball club that Kansas City inherited from Philadelphia is finally a memory. The last of the old bunch, Shortstop Joe DeMaestri, departed in a winter trade. Philadelphia's fadeout was ironically apt, for it brought in another shipment of Yankees (top left, left to right: Don Larsen, Norm Siebern, Hank Bauer, Marv Throneberry), symbol and substance of the new Athletics. Hotly debated and righteously condemned, the trafficking in ex-New Yorkers has produced one important result. It has given the Athletics an aura of professional polish. Laced with steady veterans and dotted with promising youngsters, the A's now look like a ball club. If they play like a ball club, Kansas City could jump to the top of the second division.

This is an article from the April 11, 1960 issue Original Layout

•UP THE MIDDLE
The 1959 Athletics just missed leading the league in team batting (.2627 to Cleveland's .2628) but were last in both pitching and fielding. Husky Bob Elliott, who replaced Harry Craft as manager, figures the club will again get enough runs. What he is after is a strong up-the-middle defense, and he has the nucleus for it with Second Baseman Jerry Lumpe and Center Fielder Bill Tuttle. The key man is rookie Shortstop Ken Hamlin, a former Pirate farmhand who is peppy and agile in the field. If he makes it, Lou Klimchock, the finest Athletic prospect since the move to Kansas City, can settle at third. Klimchock, 20, is a hitter more than a fielder, but he can play second, short or third. He hit .315 in the Southern Association last summer (with 44 doubles and 19 HRs), then batted .273 with the A's in the last three weeks of the season. A lefty hitter, he has good power to right and right-center and is not bothered by left-handed pitching. Lumpe sat in the shadow of Martin and McDougald during his Yankee years, and has yet to play up to his potential as a regular. A good singles hitter with negligible power, he is an improving pivot man at second.

•CERV'S SHINS
First base is yet another problem. Marv Throneberry swings and misses with outlandish regularity but manages to connect just often enough to maintain his reputation as a slugger of great promise. He is supposed to be the regular first baseman, but Bob Cerv, the team's leading RBI man, has other ideas. Fearful for his future as an aging and unaccomplished outfielder, Bob made a bid for the first-base job this spring. Self-conscious and awkward around the bag, he displayed stout shins. "We got to get him in there somewhere," says Elliott grimly. But first base does not look like the spot. Versatile Dick Williams, one of baseball's best utility men, may be pushed onto the bench this year after a solid season (16 HRs, 75 RBIs) at first and third.

•IF WISHES WERE HORSES

If they could play back to their best past performances, Kansas City's pitchers would be tough. Larsen had three fine years with the Yankees; Bob Grim won 20 one year, and Johnny Kucks won 18 another. Twelve-year veteran Ned Garver was 20-12 once with the eighth-place St. Louis Browns, and stands fourth in the league in total victories (125). But the best pitcher on the staff is Bud Daley {left below), 16-13 last year. Veteran Ray Herbert was 11-11.

Two seasoned hopefuls from the Pacific Coast League may become starters. One is Ken Johnson, 26, who last year blossomed into a 16-game winner with a 2.82 ERA. The other is Dick Hall, 29, a former infielder-outfielder-pitcher with the Pirates who was often unhittable in spring training. Hall, a gangly graduate of Swarthmore, completed 19 of 27 starts last season, won 18 and lost five, and compiled an ERA of 1.87. The bullpen is weak. Tom Acker from Cincinnati and ex-Brave Bob Trowbridge are the only experienced relievers on the staff.

Bulky Harry Chiti has the edge on Pete Daley and Hank Foiles, both new to the club, for the first-string catching job. Chiti is the best hitter and a long-ball threat.

•LOADED OUTFIELD
The Athletics are lopsided with outfield strength. Trading Roger Maris brought them Siebern and Bauer, who will probably flank Center Fielder Tuttle (.300 in '59) on Opening Day. Siebern, a good hitter, looked impressive in Florida. The spirited Bauer has pepped up the drab A's and provided a sure hand and steady arm in right. He won't hit with his old authority but still excels in the nebulous art of clutch hitting. Spelling Hank in right will be Russ Snyder (a .313 hitter in half a season last year) and Whitey Herzog, a bear-down guy who batted .293 before a leg injury benched him. If Cerv can't make it at first, he'll have to be worked into an outfield spot, unsettling the A's only settled situation. In this event, Manager Elliott will be forced into a full-scale platoon system.

View this article in the original magazine

TWO PHOTOSPHOTOCervPHOTOTuttlePHOTOChitiPHOTOGrimPHOTOWilliamsPHOTOLumpe

BASIC ROSTER

NO.

NAME

POSITION

1959 RECORD

1

WAYNE TERWILLIGBR

2B

.267

3

MARV THRONEBERRY

1B

.240

4

LOU KLIMCHOCK

IF

Minors

6

WHITEY HERZOG

OF

.293

7

NORM SIEBERN

LF

.271

8

HARRY CHITI

C

.272

9

HANK BAUER

RF

.238

11

JERRY LUMPE

2B

.241

13

BILL TUTTLE

CF

.300

14

RUSS SNYDER

OF

.313

22

PETE DALEY

C

.225

23

DICK WILLIAMS

1B-3B-OF

.266

33

BOB CERV

1B-OF

.285

18

DON LARSEN

P

6-7

24

DICK HALL

P

Minors

26

JOHNNY KUCKS

P

8-11

28

BUD DALEY

P

16-13

31

NED GARVER

P

10-13

34

BOB GRIM

P

6-10

38

RAY HERBERT

P

11-11

1959 TEAM PERFORMANCE

FINISHED

WON

LOST

GAMES BEHIND

7

66

88

28

INDIVIDUAL LEADERS

BATTING

PITCHING

TUTTLE

.300

DALEY

16-13

CERV

.285

HERBERT

11-11

MARIS

.273

GARVER

10-13

HOME RUNS

RUNS BATTED IN

CERV

20

CERV

87

MARIS

16

WILLIAMS

75

WILLIAMS

16

MARIS

72