19TH HOLE: The readers take over

May 29, 1960

THE SCORE IN BLOOMINGTON
Sirs:
I would like to compliment you on the editorial about the recruiting of athletes at Indiana University (The Right Time for Courage, May 16). I thoroughly agree that to make an example of one university because it does in the open what everyone else is permitted to do in the shadows is a great injustice to the school and also to the students who are punished by unfair and out-of-date NCAA rules.
E. J. SKINNER
Milford, Va.

Sirs:
If there is something detrimental or sensational to be said about a school, you have a great deal of space for comments (What's So Funny?, May 16), but if it is some athletic triumph, a score seems to suffice. The high favor your magazine once held among many Indiana University readers has fallen drastically and no doubt will never return to its old level.
GENE STERN
Bloomington, Ind.

ON TO THE SUMMIT
Sirs:
We are the first to say that the Chicago Cubs have often made some crazy deals. All you have to do is to look a bit around the majors and see the former Cub players now starring for various clubs. Easily visible from the headlines are Sam Jones, Don Hoak, Jim Brosnan, Bob Rush, Smoky Burgess, Dale Long, Turk Lown, Johnny Klippstein, Hobie Landrith, Bill Henry. The Cubs, of course, have gotten little return value in comparison to these talents.

However, the Cubs, at last, have made a corking trade (BASEBALL'S WEEK, May 23) by obtaining Don Cardwell and Ed Bouchee. And Cardwell is a big (6-foot 4-inch), young pitcher with a beautiful fast ball; Bouchee is a left-hander who hits the ball a country mile. Luckily, the Cubs have a guy like Lou Boudreau, who is just the manager to lead them to the summit, to make the Cubs baseball's 1960 surprise.
JOHN B. DONNELLON
Crugers, N.Y.

•There's been trouble at the summit lately.—ED.

BIG LUMP FOR A SMALL CONTINENT
Sirs:
Herbert Warren Wind (Visit to a Small Continent, May 16, 23) can take credit for stirring up the only genuine, lump-in-the-throat attack of homesickness I have suffered since leaving Melbourne just over 20 years ago.

A former dinkum Aussie can perhaps be forgiven a glow of pride and a continuing tendency to root for Australia in the Davis Cup. And perhaps my sports-minded sons will come to attribute at least a small portion of their prowess on the baseball diamond and football field to their maternal forebears.
ELAINE STEWART
Los Angeles

HISTORY LIVES AT GARDEN STATE
Sirs:
We have just read with deep concern your editorial No Time for Horses? (May 16).

By act of Congress a Civil War Centennial Commission has been created comprising 26 prominent citizens throughout the United States. In conjunction with the national and New Jersey commissions we have entered into this centennial celebration, since the Jersey Derby which we are reviving on Memorial Day was first run in Paterson, N.J. in 1864 and played an important part in the happenings of that year. In carrying out this program we are conducting on Sunday, May 29, as a civil enterprise, a free program which is being enthusiastically supported by all of the participants, including the above-mentioned commissions. As a further part of our participation in this centennial anniversary we are conducting on the morning of May 30, the day of our race, a 20-minute authentic re-enactment of a Civil War battle or skirmish participated in by two groups who are dedicated to the survival of the events of the Civil War period as a contribution to a living history of this vital period in the affairs of our nation.

It has always been our policy to find ways and means whereby the facilities of our racing plant might be made available for affairs in the public interest.
WALTER H. DONOVAN
General manager
Garden State Racing Association
Camden, N.J.

•Congratulations to Garden State for reviving the Jersey Derby and for separating the centennial program from race-day afternoon.—ED.

BONNIE IS BACK
Sirs:
Good to see Bonnie Prudden back (Fitness from the Cradle, May 2). Thank you for such an excellent article on "diaper gymnastics." It's most timely as far as our family is concerned—we have a new 5-week-old baby boy, and he does all Bonnie's recommended exercises.
MRS. C. B. FISHER
White Plains, N.Y.

Sirs:
Bonnie Prudden's simple exercises for babies would perhaps do away with a lot of needless worries later concerning round shoulders, pigeon toes or bowlegs.
MRS. BARBARA MCLAUGHLIN
Scarsdale, N.Y.

Sirs:
Never have I read a poorer choice in regard to emphasizing National Youth Fitness Week.
JAMES PRESTON LAYTON II
The Hill School
Pottstown, Pa.

Sirs:
Our son Glenn, who is now 8½ years old, as a baby resembled quite a bit the two-month-old youngster whom you pictured going through his calisthenics with Bonnie Prudden. We got a kick out of this and just thought you might too.
MRS. MILES REBEN
Levittown, N.Y.

•Immediately above is Glenn Reben; above him, René John Pouteau, Bonnie Prudden's new pupil. At right is Glenn today. His physical education has been that of the average U.S. youngster, without the special training that lies ahead for Rene John Pouteau under Bonnie Prudden's program.—ED.

TRUMP
Sirs:
While I could hardly expect my good friend Charles Goren to keep track of all local televised bridge programs, I must challenge his statement, "There have been many tries in the past to broadcast bridge, and all have failed" (Goodby to Kid Gloves, May 9).

I am moderator of a weekly half-hour televised bridge program titled What's the Bid? seen on KTLA, Los Angeles. This program started the first week of January 1958 and is still going strong.
ROBERT LEE JOHNSON
Los Angeles

THREE PHOTOS

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)