19TH HOLE: The readers take over

June 05, 1960

DE MORTUIS...
Sirs:
Bravo for SPORTS ILLUSTRATED in recognizing A Man of Quality (May 23). Aly Khan excelled as few do in important and pleasurable endeavors widely accepted by our culture.

The world has lost one of its foremost proponents of the art of living.
JAMES B. ELLSWORTH
St. Petersburg, Fla.

Sirs:
What is a man of quality? In my opinion a man of quality is one who serves his fellow man and follows a set of moral rights. Being a gambler and sportsman does not make a man of quality.
ANDREW INTERDONATO
Washington, D.C.

Sirs:
When are women at their best? When dressed in the highest fashion, glittering in the Paris social whirl and living as the mistresses of Aly Khan?

Come down off it and write with honesty and fewer stars in your eyes.
FRANK D. McCARTHY
San Francisco

Sirs:
A disgrace to the journalistic profession.
ANTHONY J. KOSTLER
Ashland, Ohio

VOX POPULI
Sirs:
Some day we rebels will take up arms and overthrow the cruel and ruthless dictatorship of the NCAA (EDITORIALS, May 16). Our cause is just! Live for the future when once again sports will be ruled as a democracy of the people, by the people and for the people.
BRUCE G. BLINN
Colton, Calif.

LIVE DANGEROUSLY
Sirs:
I read with great interest your editorial The Safetimonious Driver (May 30).

It is my firm belief that if the senseless slogan "Speed Kills" were changed to "Skill Saves" and a wholehearted effort were made to educate motorists on proper driving techniques, many many lives could be saved.

I, too, would rather be somewhere else, but as an automobile commuter driving over 100 miles per day, I have very little choice but to live dangerously.
DAVID R. ALLEN
New York City

CONFLICT OF INTERESTS
Sirs:
I was glad to see your editorial on Al Kaline's ownership of horses (A Respectable Sideline, May 30). Why Bill DeWitt concerns himself with personal investments of his players is beyond me. He should worry about the Tigers' baseball problems.

I own stock in the Baltimore Orioles, bought it from profits on stock in Hazel Park. Would Mr. DeWitt presume to ask Thoroughbred Breeder and Owner John Galbreath to give up his Darby Dan Farm because of his Pirate holdings?
JOSEPH L. ROBERTS
Forest Hills, N.Y.

TRADE
Sirs:
I am from Washington and have backed the Senators (Eighth Place Revisited, May 30) ever since they tried to nose out Detroit for the pennant (20th century I believe it was). I also have been looking for a place to go in Jamaica. Now I can pawn my box seat until the series in Washington and go to Frenchman's Cove (May 30).
HENRY J. DONALDSON
Washington, D.C.

GOOD JUDGE OF HORSES
Sirs:
Your report of the 1960 Kentucky Derby (May 16) was without exception the finest coverage of a horse race I have read. Congratulations are in order for the superb color pictures by John G. Zimmerman and Jerry Cooke and the behind-the-scenes race story written by Whitney Tower.
PHIL DIXON III
Wichita Falls, Texas

DON'T STOOP TO CONQUER
Sirs:
Magnetized metal tees (SCORECARD, May 16) might mean one less stoop yes, but no stooping at all? Delayed action springs in the cups could be devised to flip the ball back out to the golfer who has holed out.
ALAN D. STEVENS
Pleasure Ridge Park, Ky.

THIS LITTLE PIGGY...
Sirs:
Happy to learn the difference between "Piggy" (Alabama) Lambert and "Piggy" (Purdue) Lambert (19TH HOLE, May 23). Tell me—was there ever a "Piggy" who went to Marquette?
A. I. CHERTOCK
Goshen, N.Y.

GO NORTH, YOUNG MAN
Sirs:
What callow youth of tender years wrote the article about Clarence Pautzke (PAT ON THE BACK, May 23)? He writes, "Now at 52, Biologist Pautzke might be expected to ease off and plan a life of retirement." Are you kidding? Only a man of 25 could be so naive as to think that a man of 52 thinks only in terms of the boneyard. What about the late Amos Alonzo Stagg and Connie Mack? And what about the present Casey Stengel and a host of other oldtimers who look upon men of 52 as mere striplings?

As you probably have guessed by now, I will be 52 this year and, confidentially, it's bad enough without someone in a fine magazine like SPORTS ILLUSTRATED reminding me of it.
WILFRED GUENTHER
Toledo

Sirs:
It was good to read that you share our enthusiasm over Clarence Pautzke's new assignment in Alaska as assistant fish and game commissioner, and I was proud to be shown using Pautzke's method here in Washington. But I think you really owe your readers a picture of Pautzke.
TOM INIONS
Superintendent, South Tacoma Hatchery
Tacoma, Wash.

•And here he is.—ED.

BRIDGE LESSONS
Sirs:
Jack Olsen's Mad World of Bridge (May 23) is a thrilling story.

It explains a lot of questions for me—why you consider bridge a sport; why it's one of my two favorite games (the other being tennis); why my mother and my wife refused to be a card partner of my father, who was an expert nut in whist in the '80s, in bridge at the turn of the century, in auction in the '20s and in contract in the '50s (he then in his 90s); and why I revere my father's memory even though he sometimes raved at the bridge table; and why I sometimes act like my father.
RALPH WESTCOTT
Research & Planning Committee, USLTA
Chicago

PHOTOCLARENCE PAUTZKE AND TROUT

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)