CATCALLS
Sirs:
I was glad to see that takeout on the cats, pegged on Aikane and Rudy Choy by Carleton Mitchell (The Cats Squelch the Catcalls, June 6).

I, for one, hope to see the cats, handicapped on the basis of each other and subscribing to safety rules set up by veterans like Rudy Choy, Woody Brown, et al. sail as a class to Honolulu and under the auspices of Transpac.
CHIP CLEARY
Santa Ana, Calif.

Sirs:
The person who deserves chief credit for making our ideas about catamarans work is Ken Murphy, owner of Aikane. Without his willingness to try some new ideas at the risk of an expensive failure, none of us designers of ocean-going catamarans would be able, at this time, to point to worthwhile achievements in ocean racing.
RUDY CHOY
Costa Mesa, Calif.

Sirs:
Can you tell me where I might be able to obtain plans for an 18-, 20- or 24-foot catamaran?
FRED G. HANSON
Fond du Lac, Wis.

•Plans for day-sailing catamarans may be obtained from the Amateur Yacht Research Society, c/o Walter Bloemhard, 143 Glen Street, Glen Cove, N.Y. or from Robert B. Harris, MacLear & Harris, 366 Madison Avenue, New York City. Plans for cruising cats from: Rudy Choy, 2579 Oxford Lane, Costa Mesa, Calif. or Woodbridge P. Brown, Honolulu, Hawaii.—ED.

SPANISH AS SHE IS SPOKE
Sirs:
Re your story, The Sa-fra-seeko Kid (May 23)—how come a guy who was born and reared to speak Spanish can't pronounce a Spanish name? How does your sharp-eared Roy Terrell pronounce San Francisco?
ROBERT MCLOCKLIN
New York City

•Texan Terrell calls it Frisco.—ED.

HIGH COST OF HELL-RAISING
Sirs:
Shame on SPORTS ILLUSTRATED and Walter Bingham for stating that a busher like Jack Meyer has outdone Babe Ruth (The Dalton Gang Rides Again, June 13). Meyer's recent fine amounted to 8.6% of his year's salary. When Ruth was fined $5,000 it represented 9.6% of his year's salary, since in 1925, the year he was assessed this fine, he made $52,000, not the $80,000 with which Mr. Bingham credited him.
JOHN MCCORMACK
Dallas

MIDDLEWEIGHT RABBIT?
Sirs:
Regarding the Robinson-Pender fight (The Death of a King, June 20): the decision was sickening. Pender's "rabbit-punching" tactics alone would have been enough to lose him the fight. In the entire fight Pender didn't land more than seven or eight clean blows and, of these, the best were only fair; his only effective blows were landed in the clinch to the back of Robinson's neck. Robinson, though not as good as in his prime, was visibly the better fighter.

I think a slight alteration in the name of the title would be apropos. Say to "middleweight wrestling champion" or maybe just "middleweight rabbit."
BRIAN "T" WOLF
Sepulveda, Calif.

Sirs:
From all those "rabbit punches" I'd say Robinson will be bald in the back of his head.
L. R. TOBUREN
Burbank, Calif.

WATER UNDER THE BRIDGE?
Sirs:
With the completion of the Glen Canyon Dam, you say, Rainbow Bridge "is due for a dunking" (SCORECARD, June 6). Having been a half owner of Rainbow Lodge for over 20 years and having kept open and operated the trail to the bridge for much of that time, I want to set you straight on this matter.

At the first filling of the dam, the high-water mark would be at a point some 25 feet below the buttresses of the bridge, but if history repeats itself, as I am sure it will, the upper reaches of Glen Canyon Dam, including all of the side canyons, will become so dammed up with silt that in normal times the water itself will seldom reach that high.
BARRY GOLDWATER
U.S. Senator from Arizona
Washington, D.C.

•The dam's opponents contend that the beauty of the canyon beneath the natural bridge "will be spoiled by the white zone that is left when the high water of a reservoir in this area recedes. Once the water in the reservoir goes up and recedes, the stain is there forever."—ED.

PHOTORAINBOW BRIDGE SOARS 309 FEET ABOVE AREA WHICH GLEN CANYON DAM WILL FLOOD

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)