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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

July 18, 1960
July 18, 1960

Table of Contents
July 18, 1960

Sad, Bad Giants
Eclipse Of Mr. K
Beauty On The Bars
Flotsam
Rowing
Swimming
Polo
Archery
Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

GOAT VS. RABBIT
Sirs:
The middleweight division has certainly lost that quality which had made it the most exciting in boxing (Out with a Snarl, July 11).

This is an article from the July 18, 1960 issue Original Layout

The next step will be to match Fullmer and Pender for the "championship" to see which is the more effective blow—the butt or the rabbit punch.

This subscriber sees little wonder that the fights are going off television (Friday—And No Fight, July 11).
JOHN A. TAFT JR.
Sacramento, Calif.

Sirs:
It should be called the "butting championship" instead of the middleweight championship. Let's put a billy goat in training as challenger.
J. G. URQUHART
El Paso

BRAIN VS. BRAWN
Sirs:
Far from merely defending the college athletes from the usual accusations of intellectual idiocy (EDITORIAL, June 27), you seem to swing to the other extreme by implying that the athlete is possessed of even greater intellectual acumen than his nonathletic contemporaries.

To put the matter in better perspective, would it be inaccurate to suggest that the scholastic abilities of college athletes match closely the general run of students, with about the same proportion of honor students and educational bums? Let's cut out the athlete-genius bit.
FRANK BOSCHAN
Seattle

Sirs:
Athletes of the caliber of Tommy Gresham and his schoolmates are scarce. I think you picked a poor example in Georgia Tech. Tech is a specialized school, and the chances of boneheads surviving there are much less than at a number of liberal arts schools. If you wish to present convincing arguments for your editorial point, try finding a few class leaders among the athletes at such strongholds of learning as USC, Oklahoma, Miami (Fla.), N.C. State, Arizona, Auburn, LSU, Kentucky, etc.
JAMES L. COATSWORTH
Honolulu

•Take Auburn, for one. Last season's fullback, Ed Dyas, who stands comfortably ahead of 95% of all his Auburn classmates, both athletic and sedentary, last year racked up a junior year average of 2.53 out of a possible 3.00.

Take LSU, for another. Mickey Mangham, athletic scholarship holder and starting end for the past two years, boasts an average of 2.28 out of a possible 3.00.—ED.

BOLT'S BAD FORM
Sirs:
"Berserk" Bolt (Boil and Bubbles, June 27) should have laid his club down and cast himself into the lake.
E. W. RIEBETH
Hardin, Mont.

Sirs:
Regarding Tommy Bolt's form:

Bolt's weight is over too much on his left foot in picture one (see below). His backswing is too limited and his stance too wide for good club casting.

In picture two check inadequate followthrough. This limits the distance of his cast. Also, the right foot is off the ground; this is a serious fault giving rise to "hook" cast, or even to "heeling the cast" (striking member of foursome on the heel).

If Mr. Bolt corrects these faults he may become a member of the U.S. Golf Club Casting Association.
R. H. SOUTH, M.D.
President USGCCA
San Francisco

HATS ACROSS THE BORDER
Sirs:
Olivier Gendebien of Belgium was through Calgary as part of a cross-Canada trip about one month ago. In typical Calgary (Calgary Stampede) fashion, he was presented with a white cowboy hat by the Calgary Sports Car Club.

He promised faithfully to wear it at Le Mans, and to wave it high in the air if he won. Win he did, and wave it he did—and then SPORTS ILLUSTRATED goes and calls it "an American hat" (Lucky Day at Le Mans, July 4). The boys here are feeling a bit left out.
BILL GOLD
Calgary, Alta.

BIG LITTLE BEVERLY
Sirs:
I beg to differ with author Roy Terrell. In his article (The Signing of Danny Murphy, June 27) he mentioned Beverly, Mass. as "a small town 20 miles north of Boston." The latest estimate has it at some 35,000 people. This small town is also the home of such notables as Harvard crew stroke Perry Boyden, America's Ambassador to the U.N. Henry Cabot Lodge and ex-U.S. women's singles squash racquets champion Eleonora Sears, who established records for long-distance walking long before Britain's Dr. Barbara Moore was ever heard of.

Beverly, birthplace of the American Navy, also sports league champions in tennis and track, was the summer home of President Taft and railroader Henry Clay Frick.
ROBERT L. WHIDDEN JR.
Beverly, Mass.

VIVA VEECK!
Sirs:
Hurrah for Bill Veeck (Master of the Joyful Illusion, July 4)! Can he help it if he is the only man in the American League (except Jimmy Piersall) who has a sense of humor?
WILLIAM COX
Indianapolis

Sirs:
It is too bad that there are not more men in baseball the caliber of Bill Veeck. He did not, however, buy the Indians from Ellis Ryan. He bought them from the late Alva Bradley. Ellis Ryan bought the Indians from Veeck.
ROBERT L. ALPERIN
Fresno, Calif.

RUNNER AND RULES
Sirs:
Putting John Kelley on the marathon team now (EDITORIALS, July 11) would mean putting a man off the team who has earned the right to be on it, according to the rules. For Kelley, we all agree it was unfortunate. For Bob Cons, the committee voted that anything else would be unfair.
JOHN T. CORE
Olympic Track & Field Committee
Richmond, Va.

Sirs:
BLISTERS CAN HAPPEN, TOO, IN ROME'S HOT HUMIDITY.
CHUCK SHELTON
Indio, Calif.

TWO PHOTOSU.S. GOLF CLUB CASTING CANDIDATE BOLT