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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

July 25, 1960
July 25, 1960

Table of Contents
July 25, 1960

Cover
Editorials
Girls
Only Big League
Bermuda
  • When 'Finisterre,' an unconventional little potbelly of a yawl, won the Bermuda Race in 1956 yachtsmen declared her a 'rule-beater' that reaped enormous handicap benefits over competitors under the complex racing rules. When she did it again in 1958, shattering precedent, Mitchell himself modestly stated that the race was a gamble anyway. But when she won it this year for the third time in a row there was left only one explanation: superior skill and knowledge rode with her veteran captain and crew. Much of that knowledge Mitchell imparted before the race (SI, June 27), but there was one maxim he left out. Here it is now: a piece of strategy he considers the key to victory

Delicate Trish
Jerry Barber
Part III: Teach Your Child To Swim
  • Though it was long ago supplanted by the crawl as the basic stroke, the traditional breaststroke is so easy and so restful that it remains today a valuable asset, an extra margin of safety, for the beginning swimmer. In the concluding lesson of his course, veteran Coach Matt Mann presents his methods for teaching the orthodox breaststroke to children

Horse Racing
Travel
Harness Racing
Track
Wilderness
Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

THE FEEL OF THE KICK
Sirs:
"Sometimes the kick looks good, but you feel no thrust. If this is so, don't worry about it. Propulsion is truly secondary" (Teach Your Child to Swim, June 27). My whole family would like to know what you do to get propulsion after you have perfected the kick.
TORBEN CASPERSEN
Darien, Conn.

This is an article from the July 25, 1960 issue

•"The propelling force of the kick depends largely on the limpness and flexibility of the foot in the water—qualities that come with practice and more practice," says SPORTS ILLUSTRATED's swimming teacher, Matt Mann. "At first, beginners are inclined to put too much emphasis on kicking down in such a way that the foot is too stiff to offer much propulsion. You've got to feel that you're lifting the foot up, then letting it drop down, mostly from its own weight, instead of kicking it down. The whole body should be relaxed in a stretched position."—ED.

SHADE OF THE RAINBOW
Sirs:
We see her shadow holding back Rainbow Bridge's great buttress (19TH HOLE, June 27), but who is she—this long-armed, frowsy-haired, C-cupped maiden of the gulch?
BOB BURLEIGH
Holden, Mass.

•Who else but Rainbow Brigitte?—ED.

MR. & MRS. OWENS
Sirs:
As a neighbor of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Owens for over 30 years, I feel your remarks about their home are very degrading (The Dalton Gang Rides Again, June 13).

Mr. and Mrs. Owens are respected members of our community. Mr. Owens has worked hard all of his life to provide for his family. Mrs. Owens has contributed much toward establishing a good home for their children.

I, for one, hope that you extend apologies to this fine couple.
MARY DREIHAUP
Gifford, Pa.

•SPORTS ILLUSTRATED deeply regrets it was misinformed about Harry Owens and his wife, a hard-working and highly respected Pennsylvania couple.—ED.

ACHILLES' HEEL
Sirs:
Whatever became of Don Bowden (Ron and Don by the Sea, March 28)?
KEVIN McGILL
New York City

•Olympic hopeful Bowden was knocked out of contention in the Quantico, Va. armed forces championships by a torn Achilles' tendon.—ED.

UNSUNG HEROES
Sirs:
What have you guys got against the Washington Senators (BASEBALL'S WEEK, July 11)? I note that you tell all about their defeat at the hands of Mudcat Grant of Cleveland and absolutely nothing at all about their four-game winning streak which preceded this loss. Is it a crime to print good things about our Nats? Take a chance, live a little.
ELLIOT WEINER
Silver Spring, Md.

•As we recall it, it was a five-game winning streak.—ED.

Sirs:
What is wrong with you anyway? This past week, backstroke swimming star Lynn Burke of the Santa Clara Swim Club broke two world records in one meet—and what does she get for it? A PAT ON THE BACK, her picture in FACES IN THE CROWD? NO, only one little line in FOR THE RECORD (July 4). In case you didn't know—world records don't happen very often.
CAROLYN WOOD
Portland, Ore.

•For more than a line about Lynn, see page 12—ED.

Sirs:
Walter Bingham's article (Double M for Murder, July 4) contains the most words on Roger Maris that I've read anywhere. The former Kansas Cityite, it seems, must hit five homers a week even to get his picture in print. What is it about this guy?

I suppose the answer lies in Bingham's statement that Maris "reveals little of himself or his feelings."
STEVEN ZOUSMER
Sands Point, N.Y.

•If Yankee Maris wants more publicity, he'll have to do better than that 0 for 6 in the All-Stars, but here's his picture anyway.—ED.

Sirs:
I have waited week after week for an article on the Pittsburgh Pirates, but every week I get a disappointment.
R. L. HUSTON
Mercer, Pa.

•Wait two weeks more; meanwhile take a look at Pittsburgh's Gang of Pesky Heroes, May 30.—ED.

UNHONORED COACH
MY NOMINATION FOR NO. 1 AMONG COACHES SHORTCHANGED WHEN IT COMES TO RECOGNITION IS LOU LINDSEY, THE NAVY CREW COACH. NEVER BEFORE DID A SCHOOL HAVE TWO CREWS IN THE EIGHT-OARED FINAL OF THE OLYMPIC TRIALS AS NAVY DID (The Old Navy Way, July 18). SO HOW IS LINDSEY HONORED? HE IS HONORED BY NOT BEING NAMED HEAD COACH OF THE U.S. ROWING TEAM, AS IS TRADITIONALLY THE CASE FOR THE COACH OF THE WINNING EIGHT.
DICK JOHNSTON
SNYDER, N.Y.

PHOTOSHADOWY SUPPORT FOR RAINBOW BRIDGEPHOTORETICENT ROGER REVEALED IN ACTION