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CATHEY FERGUSON

July 25, 1960
July 25, 1960

Table of Contents
July 25, 1960

Cover
Editorials
Girls
Only Big League
Bermuda
  • When 'Finisterre,' an unconventional little potbelly of a yawl, won the Bermuda Race in 1956 yachtsmen declared her a 'rule-beater' that reaped enormous handicap benefits over competitors under the complex racing rules. When she did it again in 1958, shattering precedent, Mitchell himself modestly stated that the race was a gamble anyway. But when she won it this year for the third time in a row there was left only one explanation: superior skill and knowledge rode with her veteran captain and crew. Much of that knowledge Mitchell imparted before the race (SI, June 27), but there was one maxim he left out. Here it is now: a piece of strategy he considers the key to victory

Delicate Trish
Jerry Barber
Part III: Teach Your Child To Swim
  • Though it was long ago supplanted by the crawl as the basic stroke, the traditional breaststroke is so easy and so restful that it remains today a valuable asset, an extra margin of safety, for the beginning swimmer. In the concluding lesson of his course, veteran Coach Matt Mann presents his methods for teaching the orthodox breaststroke to children

Horse Racing
Travel
Harness Racing
Track
Wilderness
Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

CATHEY FERGUSON

'This year I've improved'

Although the supple young lady bending for a hot grounder does occasionally take prizes in flower arrangement, her real forte is playing a barefoot third base for the Casa View softball team in the Dallas pee wee league. She is 9-year-old Cathey Ferguson and, though she is the only girl in the league, she has managed to become accepted as one of the boys. "Last year I was put in right field," she says, "but this year I've improved." Says her coach, Lowell Peters: "Improved! She's the best third baseman in the league."

This is an article from the July 25, 1960 issue Original Layout

Cathey takes praise like this with a grain of rosin, is chiefly concerned with correcting her playing weaknesses. "Sometimes I kind of chop at the ball," she says. "I have to learn not to go for the bad ones." But why play barefoot? "You get the feel of the game better."

Despite her tomboy palaver, the soft-voiced Cathey is entirely feminine. In a recent floral competition she took a piglet water pitcher, tastefully arranged some flowers in it, for good measure placed a rose in the piglet's mouth. It earned her first prize. All in all, Cathey has neatly managed to balance fielding and femininity. "I have a boy friend," she says, "but he is not on the team."

PHOTO