19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

August 14, 1960

FLOYD'S PUBLIC
Sirs:
So Floyd Patterson just can't understand why the public was not behind him (SCORECARD, Aug. 1)? Let him turn to page 50 of the same issue and read that his manager is negotiating for a fight with one Henry Cooper of England. Who in the world is Henry Cooper? I admit that he is probably as worthy a foe as was Pete Rademacher, Roy Harris, Brian London, Hurricane Jackson, but come now, what about Liston, Machen or Folley? Could it be that Mr. D'Amato chooses a worthy contender by the improbability of the contender dethroning our Floyd?

Floyd, if you run out of contenders let me know, 'cause there's a popular tomboy down the street who is the bully of the neighborhood. Just think of the gate you'd draw.
W. LENOY
New York City

Sirs:
Floyd Patterson should not feel that his fellow Americans were not behind him when he regained his championship. I not only believed he could, but hoped very much that he would.

We felt that, win or lose, Patterson is a credit to his sport and his country. No one hears him bragging about his "left."
FRANCES TYSEN NUTT
New York City

Sirs:
In his excellent article (Heavyweight in Waiting, Aug. 1) Gilbert Rogin wondered what Sonny Liston would do if he had to give ground or, in other words, if he got hit himself. Having seen Sonny fight many times, I can answer that. Sonny has been hit by some of the best punchers in the game, like Nino Valdes, Cleveland Williams, Mike DeJohn, Billy Hunter and Zora Folley who himself had 29 kayos to his credit. Sonny shook them all off and dispatched them all with his own size 14 fists.
HARRY SANFORD
Los Angeles

FINALLY THIS SUMMER
Sirs:
For years my favorite beach sport (second to girl watching) has been the standing broad jump. Finally—this year—I measured one of my best jumps and found it to be 8 feet 2 inches. Now I want to know what's been done in this event.
ELVIN PLATTI
Tracy, Calif.

•Nothing extraordinary has happened since Aug. 29, 1904, when Ray Ewry of St. Louis jumped 11 feet 4[7/8] inches in St. Louis.—ED.

SALAD DAYS
Sirs:
Please explain what a "salad of rugola" is, which Fred Smith mentions in The Byways of Capri (May 25).
A. J. MRUGALA
Cambridge, Mass.

•Rugola, says Fred Smith, shown above nibbling at his desk, is a watercress-shaped salad green that adds a piquant flavor to a tossed green salad. It can also be served alone with vinegar and oil dressing. Known as arugola, rucola, ruccoli or rocket salad, it can be found at some Italian greengrocers in Boston.—ED.

BLACK BUTYS
Sirs:
I was astonished to read William Leggett's article about this thing they call Butazolidin (Mysterious Buty Treatment, Aug. 1).

Going to the races has been a pleasant pastime for me for many years. The normal odds against picking a winner are high enough; but when you add another factor the problem gets hopeless.
KENNETH R. PYATT
San Antonio

Sirs:
I am about to compile my performance figures, but first must know whether the Daily Racing Form or Morning Telegraph has devised a system to designate Buty horses to the possibly unwary chart reader. A simple lower-case "b" might mean the horse was breezing, or even bewitched, bothered and bewildered—but then, a Buty horse is liable to be all four. I'm sure the brain trust at Triangle Publications could devise an elaborate symbol such as the word Butazolidin spelled vertically in the form of a hypodermic syringe.
HARRY D. SNYDER JR.
Saratoga Springs, N.Y.

•The Morning Telegraph lists those horses which have received Butazolidin in its charts for the previous day's racing at Arlington Park, where the drug may be legally administered. The track itself, as William Leggett pointed out in his article, lists Buty horses for the day's racing on mimeograph sheets posted at the track.—ED.

THE REST IS SILENCE
Sirs:
Congratulations to Jack Olsen for The Land of Silence (July 25). Those of us who have experienced the therapy and spiritual uplift of wilderness living will consider this a classic bit of writing. It is Emerson and Thoreau at their best.
FRANK WOLYNEC
Westport, Conn.

Sirs:
Just reading about The Land of Silence was extremely restful.
MARK ROSEN
West Orange, N.J.

GIANT BANTAM
Sirs:
Your story of Jerry Barber (A Barber with a Razor Edge, July 25) is a long-overdue and richly deserved tribute to a fighting, working champion.

I had the pleasure of meeting Barber when he was in Tucson for our 1960 Open. In an interview here, he was asked his height. "Oh, about 6 feet 3!" "Weight?" "Oh, about 210 pounds." And finally, "How much longer do you think you'll be on the tour?" "About another 10 or 12 years."
MARY BLYTHE
Tucson, Ariz.

WHEW!
Sirs:
Those San Francisco Zoo officials could certainly do better than SOO-HOO GIVES GNU TO ZOO (PAT ON THE BACK, Aug. 1). How about NEW ZOO GNU DUE TO SOO-HOO? Whew!
Mrs. JOHN FAY
Dorset, Vt.

OLD MASTER OF THE SEA
Sirs:
Your SPECTACLE "Sun on Sails and Sea" (July 25) was a masterful job. Henry Koehler's paintings captured every moment and emotion of this great regatta.
MIKE WOOTERS
Chicago

PHOTOFRED SMITH AND RUGOLA

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)