19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

August 28, 1960

A QUESTION OF THEEYE
Sirs:
You fellows should get a gold medal yourselves for compiling the SpecialOlympic Issue (Aug. 15).
STEVE BELL
San Gabriel, Calif.

Sirs:
Caught myself saying very good, and again, very good indeed.
HUGH M. SCOTT
Montreal

Sirs:
All I saw was a bunch of jazz on what the athletes couldn't eat while they werein Rome, and pretty women from the U.S.S.R.
A. READEC
Albuquerque

A QUESTION OF THESOUL
Sirs:
I wholeheartedly agree with International Olympic Committee Member AlbertMayer's idea of defining professionalism rather than amateurism and using thisas a basis for deciding who is eligible for the Olympics (A Question of theSoul, Aug. 15).

However, Idisagree with Chris Chataway's idea of opening the Games to both professionalsand amateurs. Chataway's plan opens the door to those who were never meant toparticipate in the Games.

If Mayer's planis adopted, the standards will be upheld, the competition will be good, and themessy situation will be cleared up.
T.O'KEEFFE
Catonsville, Md.

ON AND OFF THERECORD
Sirs:
You say that Jesse Owens set a world broad jump record at the 1936 Olympics(Olympic Cavalcade, Aug. 15). Although he won the Olympic event, Owens did notbreak the record of 26 feet 8¼ inches which he had set the previous year at AnnArbor, and which still stands as by far the oldest record on the books.
JOHN CHAPPELL JR.
Topeka, Kans.

•As noted inSCORECARD (Aug. 22), Ralph Boston of Tennessee State University set a new markof 26 feet 11¼ inches on Aug. 12.—ED.

Sirs:
Is there women's basketball in the Olympics?
J. E. SANDORS
Eugene, Ore.

•No.—ED.

Sirs:
Are my eyes deceiving me, or does the second lady from the right in the 1932women's 80-meter hurdles have a higher hurdle than all the rest?
JONATHAN GOLDSTEIN
Great Neck, N.Y.

•The full-lengthphotograph of Japan's Michi Nakanishi {see above) shows her hurdle to besuspended several inches off the track. Deduction: the camera caught MissNakanishi knocking the hurdle over.—ED.

A WALK IN THESUN
Sirs:
Your statements that the 20-and 50-kilometer walking events "couldn't meanless to Americans" and that the U.S. entry will finish far behind and happyfor the "free trip" to Rome are absolutely not in keeping with thetruth (FORM CHART, Aug. 15). We have a devoted bunch of boys going over to Romefor these two events, and they may well finish not so far behind as you seem tothink.

Let us at leasthope so and send them every good wish. That, I am sure you will agree, is farpreferable to sending them to Rome bitter at the American public which SPORTSILLUSTRATED is supposed to represent.
ELLIOTT H. DENMAN
Briarwood, N.Y.

•Every good wishindeed, and a cheering "Go, go, go" to Walkers Rudy Haluza, RonaldZinn, Robert Mimm, Ronald Laird, John Allen and Bruce MacDonald.—ED.

WHAT DID YOU DO?NOTHING
Sirs:
Hats off to Roger Price {How to Crookshank, Aug. 1). I am happy to report thatthis new and ingenious form of recreation is growing with leaps and bounds, orshould I say squats and sulks, in our community. Already an eight-teamCrookshank League, consisting of one player per team, has been formed.

Gone is the sightof noisy neighborhood baseball games. Playgrounds are giving way to thrivinghousing projects. Up Crookshank!
EUGENE WHITBECK
Clarks Summit, Pa.

TAKE IT EASY
Sirs:
Thanks to Roger Price and you, I have found my niche in the world of sports.Count me in as an avid and (for want of a better word) active Crookshanker.Unfortunately, as part of my training, I am forced to discontinue my weekly,strenuous reading of your magazine.
J. DILL
Washington, D.C.

Sirs:
After reading How to Crookshank, I have come to the conclusion that it must bethe heart of the physical education programs in many schools—and theup-and-coming major sport.
TRUDI SHAFFER
Johnstown, Pa.

SOMETHINGHAPPENED
Sirs:
Your comment to a letter in 19TH HOLE (Aug. 15) indicates nothing has happenedin the standing broad jump since Ray Ewry jumped 11 feet 4‚Öû inches in 1904. Letme draw your attention to Track & Field News, December 1956: Standing broadjump—Bergen, Norway, Nov. 24, 1956: John Evandt claimed world record jump—11feet 5¾ inches.
FRANK FANRAK
Philadelphia

IT'S A BIRD; IT'SA PLANE; IT'S TERRELL
Sirs:
Roy Terrell's excellent article on soaring (They Fly Through the Air, Aug. 22)was extremely well done, factual, amusing and beautifully illustrated. In fact,the coverage was so complete and true to life that I felt that I was attendingthe meet and seeing it with my own eyes.
ROBERT W. BROWER
Mission, Kans.

PHOTOHIGH HURDLE?

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)