19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

September 04, 1960

CONTINENTAL'S LAST CALL
Sirs:
I want to thank you for the very kindly manner in which you and your entire staff have treated Continental League endeavors to expand major league baseball. You have been more than cooperative and very constructive in assisting us in our attempt to explain to the public the necessity of expansion. Your staff must also have felt a deep satisfaction knowing it had been extremely helpful in the expansion of baseball for the first time in over 60 years.

Mr. Rickey and I do not agree with you as to the best method of expansion (EDITORIAL, Aug. 1), nor is the present plan (SCORECARD, Aug. 15) strictly in accordance with our thinking. However, there are always two sides to be considered, and inasmuch as the major leagues, as represented at our meeting in Chicago, believed their method was the best to continue the high caliber of major league ball, our owners have acquiesced and our opinion has become academic.

Since the major leagues are in control of the players and have the means of making a distribution of players which would solve the player difficulty, we feel it can all work out for the best.
WILLIAM A. SHEA
New York City

ON AGAIN, CHAMBERLAIN!
Sirs:
I beg to commend you on your EDITORIAL concerning Wilt Chamberlain (Aug. 22). Certainly, big league sports does not want favoritism of any type or for any reason. Just let the best man win.
MELVIN E. BECK
Washington, D.C.

Sirs:
I cannot see why every Negro, whether of little or no prominence at all, seems to feel that he must forever carry the race problem on his back. As a well-known comic-strip character says, "I yam what I yam, and tha's all I yam!" To expect every Negro to be constantly a racial symbol is too much to expect of any individual. It is an unbearable burden, and many a Negro is caught in a web of frustration because of trying to be such a symbol.

I am hoping that Chamberlain, the Negro ballplayers, and Negroes in general will get away from this habit of seeing everything in terms of race, for actually it is the mark of a feeling of inferiority which we have no need to feel. I also wish that other well-meaning people, such as yourselves, would let each one of us stand or fall through his own merits and forget about his race and the effects thereof.
SPENCER L. GUTRIDGE
Worcester, Mass.

CONDITIONS ARE FAVORABLE
Sirs:
They Fly Through the Air by Roy Terrell with A. Y. Owen's photographs (Aug. 22) is most timely, and excellently done.

Particularly commendable, I think, is Terrell's description of soaring flight. He is very correct, both technically and esthetically. I would suspect that he is an airman in his own right. Otherwise, he would not have been so knowledgeable.
ERWIN J. REEVES
Past President,
Soaring Society of America
Dallas

•Associate Editor Roy Terrell, a Marine Corps pilot during World War II, has a total of 3,000 hours of military and civilian flying, including some 50 hours in jets, but this was his first time in a sailplane. Terrell's comment: "It was great. But I kept reaching for the throttle."—ED.

Sirs:
Congratulations on the excellent soaring article. With so little written about this most fascinating sport, far be it from me to criticize. However, coming from Elmira, "the soaring capital of America," I feel that the statement, "At Elmira, N.Y., where soaring conditions are not so favorable as in California or Texas," may be misunderstood.

Conditions in Elmira, and generally in the eastern part of the country, are entirely adequate for soaring, and many outstanding and record flights have been made from Elmira. We are frank to admit that at certain times in the West and Southwest conditions are stronger.

I feel that soaring in the East, over-all, is more satisfying and that soaring sites like Elmira provide for much more competitive meets where the pilot factor tends to be more important than the sailplane.
PAUL A. SCHWEIZER
Vice-President, Schweizer Aircraft Corp.
Elmira, NY.

ON DANNY! ON CASEY!
Sirs:
Re Danny vs. Casey (Aug. 22): the Pirates win good like real champions should. That flag will fly high in beautiful Forbes Field despite any Stengelese to the contrary!
PAUL E. WALTHOUR
Phoenix, Ariz.

Sirs:
As traumatic events in history have influenced peoples' political choices, so past Yankee domination in baseball has influenced present-day voting for the 1960 American League pennant.

However, there has been a definite change in the American League. Yankee confidence is no longer the only ingredient in the kettle; White Sox power, defensive play and speed, coupled with young Oriole pitching and clutch hitting, have made the soup much more pungent and spicy. When the kettle finally blows its lid and emits the steam from within, maybe it will be the Yankee ingredient that will lose its savor.
JOHN R. LEOPOLD
State College, Pa.

BARBARA VS. BIKINIS
Sirs:
Such an attractive, dimpled Barbara McIntire on the cover of your August 22 issue. But it's the pages inside that count, of course. The Corfu island coverage (A Big Aloha from Corfu, Aug. 22) would be in better taste if it eliminated some of the bikini-clad damsels.
MRS. ROBERT T. BURNS
Philadelphia

CRABSLAYER'S COMPLEX
Sirs:
Barbara Heilman's beautifully written article (The Crabslayer, Aug. 29) has salved an inferiority complex resulting from a passion for crabbing that I learned to share with no one except a younger brother. Occasional bursts of sentiment on behalf of crabbing brought either rebuke or sympathy. You've brought dignity to our sport, made it noble. I now feel fortified—and normal. The Crabslayer should serve as a fitting prospectus for some sort of association of crabslayers. Aside from promoting our sporting interest, we would share the fellowship with what I think would be the nicest people you'd ever want to know.
JIM VAN BUREN
Atlanta

PHOTOTERRELL IN COUGAR JET IN 1954

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)