19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

September 11, 1960

THE BUBBLE BLOWERS
Sirs:
An interesting companion piece to the photo of "Best Bubble Blower" Pitcher Milt Pappas of the Baltimore Orioles in your latest issue (The Pennant Race Bubbles Along, Aug. 29) is the one of "Bubble Gum Consumer Mickey Mantle" in the very first issue of your magazine: August 16, 1954.
HENRY D. SHENK
Harrisburg, Pa.

YANKEES VS. COLTS
Sirs:
They say baseball is a game of percentages, and believe me your article Danny vs. Casey (Aug. 22) sure proves this out. The players' pennant poll shows, to the nearest percentage point, that: Only 73% of games had been played up to voting time; 61% of all American League players participating voted that the Yankees would win; 91% of the second-place team (Baltimore) voted for the Yankees; and 100% of the fans like myself are fools to drive through heavy downtown traffic, park in a back alley lot for outrageous prices and stay up later than usual to hear or witness a game whose players are ready to give up so soon.

No sir, it's not for me. I'm sticking to Cousy, Pettit, Layne and Unitas. You've never seen them give up before the third quarter.
G. J. BURKE
Detroit

FAMILY MAN
Sirs:
By what standards of twisted, bigoted logic can Fighter Sonny Liston's knowledge of how many brothers and sisters he has affect his fitness to box (EDITORIALS, Aug. 29)?
J. BRIMBLE
Buena Park, Calif.

Sirs:
A few things about Liston you did not mention. One, he comes from a family of 25 children, and he cannot read or write. Two, the facts regarding the beating of a St. Louis policeman indicate that the officer had slurred, insulted and tried to pick a fight with Liston. Liston gave this policeman the beating he asked for. Just because a man in a uniform represents the law, he is not above the same rules of conduct that the rest of us are held to.

Sonny Liston became a target of convenience as far as the St. Louis police were concerned. He paid for his past mistakes and only wants to do the thing he can do best, fight.
HARRY SANFORD
Los Angeles

POLL POLE
Sirs:
Whoever wrote "Fishy Poll" (EDITORIAL, Aug. 22) must be the "gentleman in tails and top hat," etc. described in the article. No real fisherman, particularly a trout angler, would ever stoop so low as to describe a trout rod as a fishing pole.
A. GOLDSTEIN
San Mateo, Calif.

•Who called that fishing pole a trout rod?—ED.

OF MOUNTAINS AND MEN
Sirs:
Without in any way sharing the strange urge that sets men against mountains, I have always respected that urge and admired the climbers. But the Swiss assault on Dhaulagiri, and its introduction of the airplane as a climbing aid, only confuses me (Conquest of the Peak of Storms, Aug. 29). Dyhrenfurth writes that he and his companions used an airplane to fly them and their supplies to 18,700 feet, which was the highest altitude at which it could land and take off. The implication is strong that if the plane could have taken them higher, they would have let it. Presumably, airplanes will be built capable of landing at 25,000 feet, and what then? "Above us, as we clambered from our Beechcraft, loomed Khatchapoora, the howling white tyrant, its craggy summit towering 326 feet over our heads"?

But never mind about future improvements. I should think that an airlift to 18,700 feet is more than enough to take the bloom off Mallory's mystic rose. And I should think that if one is going to set himself up as a mountain climber—and write articles about what a tough go it is—one ought to walk up the mountain, not fly up.
RICHARD W. BOETH
New York City

PAY DIRT
Sirs:
Congratulations for the generous space you devoted to the fast-growing sport of rodeo riding (Seesaw on Bulls, Aug. 29). However, Cheyenne was not "the biggest of the summer rodeos."

The four-day golden-jubilee California Rodeo at Salinas had 480 entries and a purse of $72,339. The $2,789 Harry Tompkins won at this rodeo was a deciding factor in his regaining the lead in the Ail-Around Cowboy championship race.
ERIC W. COSTER
Salinas, Calif.

THE FIRST OLD LADY
Sirs:
Your coverage of our once-proud hydroplane race was excellent (Seattle's Deadly Farce, Aug. 22). However, one small item deserves correction: your reference in the 19TH HOLE to Miss Spokane as "the old lady." In hydroplaning there is but one Old Lady—Slo-Mo-Shun IV.
BRUCE MACDONALD
Seattle

•No slight was intended toward the retired first lady of hydroplaning—shown below speeding at 160.32 mph
to break Malcolm Campbell's world record of 141.74 in 1950.—ED.

OF MOTORS AND MEN
Sirs:
"Beneath the aluminum hide of [Donald] Campbell's turbine-engined Bluebird lies the greatest potential performance of any land-speed automobile ever built" (A Look Inside the Campbell Car, Aug. 22).

Considering today's automotive development, I'd say the Bluebird was created to test man's performance.
J. C. DUNLAP
Waco, Texas

TWO PHOTOSBASEBALL BUBBLERS PAPPAS AND MANTLE PHOTOFIRST LADY'S FAST RUN FOR RECORD

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)