19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

September 18, 1960

PLUMB WRONG
Sirs:
I for one am not fooled by the cover picture on the August 29 issue of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED. The picture was obviously tilted to make the mountain slope look steeper. Everything about the man's position tells me that the picture was taken on a slope about 45° less severe than the cover would lead you to believe. Am I right? Come now, 'fess up.
C. MARVIN ANDERSEN
Hawthorne, Calif.

•Wrong. Photographer-Climber Norman Dyhrenfurth attests that the climber pictured was negotiating an almost vertical ice wall, as indicated by the rope which hangs from his waist in much the fashion of a plumb bob (see below).—ED.

COLT CHANCES
Sirs:
Don't make the same mistake this year. Pick the Baltimore Colts.
EDWARD FAINBERG
Baltimore

•For Football Expert Tex Maule's estimate of the Colts' 1960 chances, wait one week.—ED.

TIGER, TIGER
Sirs:
Tiger in Grandma's Lap (Sept. 5) had nothing to do with kittens and grandmas, and people who love cats do not love Mr. Corey Ford.
DORE WEINER
Amagansett, N.Y.

Sirs:
House cats are a menace to all wildlife and should be killed if found 50 yards from any habitation.
DON WILLIAMS
Porterville, Calif.

Sirs:
There is no more pitiful sight than a starving, abandoned cat, and shooting it is doing it a service. God has given cats the ability and desire to catch birds (also grasshoppers, mice and rats that cause much harm), but the cats are starving. Why? One reason in our neighborhood is the depopulation of the birds by the little darlings who own BB guns. As if this isn't enough, the few remaining birds post lookouts to warn the rest of approaching danger. It's getting tough all over, Tiger! Better see your Love the Little Kitties Association.

At the moment my cats are sitting near the flower bed hoping to catch a hummingbird. They read somewhere that hummingbird's tongue is quite a treat.
MRS. LAURA COUCH
Flagstaff, Ariz.

Sirs:
I have never heard of a cat hater who did not turn out to be a tyrant. Among the best-known cat haters in history are: Napoleon Bonaparte and Nikita Khrushchev. The reason is obvious. What cats and cat lovers alike prize above all else is freedom.
JEAN MAY
New York City

Sirs:
I laughed so hard that I almost went into hysteria. Since I don't wish to risk this happening again, please cancel my subscription to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED.

My wife, who likes cats, no longer likes your organization, so please cancel her subscription to TIME as well.
PAUL WALKER
Washington, D.C.

•SPORTS ILLUSTRATED can accept responsibility only for cat-loving wives on its own subscription list.—ED.

Sirs:
I wouldn't use the pages of your ailurophobic rag to line the bottom of my kitty's bathroom box.
PRISCILLA OGDEN
New York City

UGLY OLYMPIANS
Sirs:
We've done it again. We sent the "Ugly American" to Rome. Only this time we sent a group of them to represent us in the Olympics where everybody in the world could watch.

I mean the officials and sportswriters who acted like a group of spoiled cry-babies.

So one of our swimmers lost the decision in a photo finish and the judges turned our appeal down. Is this any reason to drag out the crying towel and throw a public tantrum?

Are we so satiated with victory that we've forgotten how to lose gracefully? Or do we picture ourselves as a master race with athletes who shouldn't lose?
BEN PREECE
Santa Monica, Calif.

Sirs:
It is a sorry day indeed when the wire services have to conspire to make the U.S. win the Olympics on paper alone. By a fixed scoring system favoring American track victories over Russian victories in gymnastics this will be accomplished, but who is going to be fooled? A medal is a medal, and who is to say that one is more valuable than another? Maybe to the U.S. track and field is the most important of all sports, but to many other countries other events are more important.
FRANK H. STUCKERT
Canoga Park, Calif.

Sirs:
Stop! Stop! Stop! Quick, somebody—anybody—stop TV Olympic coverage of soccer. Do you want to kill American football?
WILLIAM J. DUEMO
Kokomo, Ind.

HAPPY HUMANS
Sirs:
The Happy as a Clam picture of the four Roman Catholic nuns was a jarring note (Sept. 5). Why don't you leave religious pictures out? Are you going to show four Protestant clergymen, then four rabbis? Why this Catholic plug?

Having introduced four nuns as "very human beings," are you planning to do the same for representatives of other major religious faiths? I shall value a definite statement on this policy and specific point.
V. JUDSON WYCKOFF
Greencastle, Ind.

•This magazine definitely will continue to print pictures of human beings happily at play whenever and wherever it may find them.—ED.

THE BIRDS
Sirs:
After a series of articles expressing confidence in the almost certain Yankee pennant, I hope you now recognize that the Orioles might have "something." You ignored the Colts until it became obvious that they were the best in the world. You have similarly greatly underplayed the tremendous vigor, spirit and skill of Paul Richards' wonderful aggregation of baseballers. No one has won the American League pennant yet, but many readers of your magazine in Maryland hope you will be sufficiently humble to retract some of the belittling statements issued through this season about our Birds, and—win or lose the league race—to credit them with the great sporting courage they have shown since the All-Star break.
FRANK W. DAVIS JR., M.D.
Baltimore

•Early in the race we called the Baltimore Orioles "the surprise of the 1960 season" (SI, June 13), and we are still wide-eyed with wonder and admiration at their sustained high flights.—ED.

SLY SINGLETON
Sirs:
Gerber goofed! (CHARLES GOREN, Aug. 15).

If South had paused to reflect on the true meaning of East's play of diamond 8, he would have taken the first trick and subsequently four spades, two hearts, two clubs and, conceivably, another diamond.

No combination of the outstanding diamonds (Q-10-9-2) could possibly hurt the declarer.

Mr. Goren's "Extra Trick" should have read: "Don't try for a swindle by means of a deceptive discard when the hand is ice-cold by straightforward play."
J. A. CARSON
Oklahoma City

•"It is easy enough for us to see (above) that the diamond 8 was a singleton," says Card Editor Goren, "but as far as John Gerber (South) could tell, East might have held the 8 and 9."—ED.

PHOTO

NORTH

[Ace of Spades]
[Jack of Spades]
[10 of Spades]
[9 of Spades]
[4 of Spades]
[7 of Hearts]
[6 of Hearts]
[3 of Hearts]
[Ace of Clubs]
[8 of Clubs]
[6 of Diamonds]
[5 of Diamonds]
[4 of Diamonds]

WEST

[King of Spades]
[5 of Spades]
[3 of Spades]
[King of Hearts]
[2 of Hearts]
[King of Clubs]
[4 of Clubs]
[3 of Clubs]
[King of Diamonds]
[Queen of Diamonds]
[10 of Diamonds]
[9 of Diamonds]
[2 of Diamonds]

SOUTH

[8 of Spades]
[2 of Spades]
[Ace of Hearts]
[Queen of Hearts]
[Jack of Hearts]
[4 of Hearts]
[Queen of Clubs]
[Jack of Clubs]
[7 of Clubs]
[Ace of Diamonds]
[Jack of Diamonds]
[7 of Diamonds]
[3 of Diamonds]

EAST

[Queen of Spades]
[7 of Spades]
[6 of Spades]
[10 of Hearts]
[9 of Hearts]
[8 of Hearts]
[5 of Hearts]
[10 of Clubs]
[9 of Clubs]
[6 of Clubs]
[5 of Clubs]
[2 of Clubs]
[8 of Diamonds]

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)