19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

November 07, 1960

CASEY'S WALK
Sirs:
Dan Topping and Del Webb have done baseball the greatest disservice since 1919, when a group of White Sox defected to the lure of the easy buck. (Goodby, Casey, Goodby, Oct. 31.)
A. F. McKENZIE
Neepawa, Man.

Sirs:
Shades of Terry Brennan! Break out the crying towels! The capitalistic owners have done it again—they have released poor, starving old Casey Stengel and ruined his life.
CHARLES HENDRICKS
Portland, Ore.

Sirs:
Maybe Webb and Topping are just getting tired of Yankee domination of the American League, and want to give some other team a chance.
RICHARD FEUER
New York City

Sirs:
A tip of the hat to Roy Terrell who wrote in the July 22, 1957 issue of SPORTS ILLUSTRATED: "AS long as the team [Yankee] wins, Weiss will be the boss. Should it fail, Weiss will undoubtedly go, but only after Casey has preceded him through the door."
FRANK J. SCIRO
Paterson, N.J.

LEGAL SAVAGERY
Sirs:
The huge men in the picture (below) may be fighting a "savage war," but that doesn't permit them to go against the rules (The Violent Face of Pro Football, Oct. 24). I am referring to the photograph of a pro pileup in which a man is in the process of having his face guard grabbed, an obvious infraction of the rules.
JERRY KLEIN
Lincolnwood, Ill.

•According to NFL rules: "It is permissible to grasp or grab the face guard of a ball carrier," just as Big Daddy Lipscomb is doing in the picture.—ED.

Sirs:
Your excerpts from The Pros were splendid—but this is no excuse to eliminate your weekly coverage.
L. FINKEL
Philadelphia

Sirs:
I don't know if it was because you became too interested in A Curry Named for Eve or My Misguided Tour (October 24), but you seemed to have forgotten pro football.
ART ATKINSON
Coldwater, Mich.

LIVELY OLDSTER
Sirs:
Those who describe Tennessee football as old, dull, bleak or uninteresting (FOOTBALL'S FIFTH WEEK, Oct. 24) fall into four groups: men who do not know anything about football; women who have never seen a game before; people who prefer gymnastics; and SPORTS ILLUSTRATED writers. Remember—old does not necessarily mean outdated.
J. T. VOOKLES
ROY SEALS
Memphis

REPENTANT SKEPTIC
Sirs:
Time and again I have been impressed by your devotion to integrity in sports and your successful attacks upon corruption in all its forms.

However, having observed crusades by other publications which turned out to be merely appeals to the gullibility of the public and bids for popularity, I have been skeptical as well. Most of the others abandoned their lofty positions once they had arrived. I somewhat cynically expected you to follow suit.

Having at last been convinced of your honesty of purpose by the editorials in your October 24 issue (Keep the Spoilers Out of Sport, The Sore-horse Kick), I commend you upon a unique journalistic venture. Honesty for its own sake is so rare in most forms of human endeavor that it is almost unbelievable.
L. HAMILTON LOWE
Austin, Texas

FUDGE OFFENSIVE
Sirs:
I made Duffy Daugherty's fudge (Grill and Gridiron, Oct. 10) with appalling results, and I can only conclude that Duffy, Debbie (19TH HOLE, Oct. 24), et al. have never been exposed to really good chocolate fudge. May I suggest that you forward my recipe to Duffy?
MRS. H. W. THOMAS
Washington, D.C.

MRS. THOMAS' FUDGE

2 cups sugar
2 squares chocolate, cut up
3/4 cup rich milk (or half milk, half cream)
dash of salt
2 tablespoons light corn syrup
3 tablespoons butter
1 teaspoon vanilla
1 cup coarsely chopped walnuts, if desired

Combine sugar, chocolate, milk, salt, corn syrup, and stir over low-to-medium heat until sugar is dissolved. Cover and bring to slow boil. Then boil slowly for three minutes. Uncover and boil slowly, without stirring, to soft-ball stage (238°). Remove from heat; let cool a few minutes. Add butter, vanilla, without stirring. Let stand until the bottom of the pan is no longer hot to the touch, then beat hard until very thick. Add walnuts and turn into buttered pan. Let set until firm and cut in squares.

ZESTFUL ZYMURGY
Sirs:
Your attempts to explain the intricacies of the ancient sport of zymurgy have fallen short of the mark (SCORECARD, Oct. 24). Your writers could use more facts (and perhaps samples) and less rumor from some obvious West Coast amateurs.

We Kansans use a far simpler and cheaper method of brewing, which is guaranteed to be superior to even Milwaukee's finest: a 3-pound can of hop-flavored malt is stirred into 14 gallons of water at room temperature, after which 7 pounds of sugar is added. To this mixture, add a small portion of yeast and leave it alone until ready to bottle, usually seven to nine days. This yields 56 quarts of excellent beer containing about 5% alcohol by volume.

The advantages of being your own beer-master, quite an elite sport in itself, are many: price, 3.4 cents a quart; stock on hand, 56 quarts, will contain any party.
CHARLES TOWNER
Salina, Kans.

PHOTOBALL CARRIER GIFFORD AND TACKLERS

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)