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Ripping Time for RPI

Jan. 23, 1961
Jan. 23, 1961

Table of Contents
Jan. 23, 1961

Cover
Ski Machine
Kiwi And Kid
  • By Arlie W. Schardt

    A continent apart, two natural phenomena detonated the indoor track and field season. At Portland, Ore. a New Zealand Olympic winner cut 12 seconds off the indoor two-mile record, while at Boston, in another two-mile, a 17-year-old Canadian schoolboy upset a veteran field

Desert Debacle
Zermatt
Oldest Freshman
The Crosby
Motor Sports
College Basketball
Boating
Bobby Fischer
  • The best young chess players in the world are Americans, and the best American is 17-year-old Bobby Fischer. Most experts believe he will soon become the best player alive. A few think he is likely to be the best who ever lived. Now a four-time U.S. champion and the youngest Grand Master in history, Fischer plays a daring, sometimes wild game. With it he may break Russia's long monopoly of the chess championship of the world

Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

Ripping Time for RPI

The expressions on the faces at left and right reflect with accuracy the feelings of the student engineers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute toward their favorite game. What football is to most great state universities, what basketball is to many a confined city college, hockey is to RPI, a small-town but select technical school in upstate Troy, N.Y. Relatively unknown in the sports world a decade ago, Rensselaer in the last 10 years has developed a first-class artificial rink, a top-flight coach, local enthusiasm and the native skills of some of its Canadian students into what is currently the No. 1 college hockey team in the East. The team is shown here in its recent tournament with Princeton, Harvard and Canada's University of New Brunswick. RPI won.

This is an article from the Jan. 23, 1961 issue Original Layout

The RPI Bench watches anxiously as Princeton threatens goal in a game that RPI finally won 11-3. At far end of bench is volatile, 41-year-old RPI coach, Ned Harkness, who took over direction of the Engineer hockey squad 10 years ago, four years later led them to the NCAA championship. At right: Harvard and second-place winner, New Brunswick, fight for puck at center ice.

TWO PHOTOSJAMES DRAKEPHOTOJAMES DRAKEDIMINUTIVE WINGMAN TREVOR KAYE (5 FEET 5), RPI'S LEADING SCORER, PLEADS FOR A VICTORY OVER NEW BRUNSWICK TEAM