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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Jan. 30, 1961
Jan. 30, 1961

Table of Contents
Jan. 30, 1961

Four Fine Days
Safe Driving
Warm And Lovely
Hockey
Track
Ten Tall Men
Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

VISIBLY TOPS
Sirs:
Gilbert Rogin's The Invisible Champion (Jan. 16) is one of the most sensitive, thoughtful and understanding biographical pieces it has ever been my pleasure to read.
RICHARD W. WEST
Washington, D.C.

This is an article from the Jan. 30, 1961 issue Original Layout

Sirs:
The stroke-by-stroke description of Arnold Palmer's personal nightmare on the 18th hole during the Los Angeles Open (SCORECARD, Jan. 16) will be recounted for years to come. But it should be added, I think, that Palmer's actions following his four out-of-bounds will be remembered for just as long a time by many of us who saw him.

He remained quiet, seemingly unperturbed, and waited for his turn on the green. Afterwards, he immediately set out upon the task of signing autographs for eight or 10 young boys who were waiting for him. In keeping with being chosen your Sportsman of the Year, his composure under the most trying conditions remained that of a real champion—even if his golf for a minute or two had not.
PATRICK A. LEJEUNE
South Pasadena, Calif.

GHOSTS AND GAELS
Sirs:
Your story on basketball player Terry Dischinger of Purdue (Ghost Along the Wabash, Jan. 23) was spirited enough, but your writer doesn't know a foul shot from a shot fowl. Purdue doesn't stand a ghost of a chance against Ohio State or Indiana this season.
GORDON COLE
Indianapolis

Sirs:
I would like to call your attention to the fact that there are basketball games played in the West! And there is one player in the West Coast Athletic Conference who deserves mention: Saint Mary's All-America Tom Meschery.

It takes more than points to be a real All-America, and Tom Meschery has everything it takes: leadership, rebounding power, spirit, know-how. What's more, he has the points too. He averages 13 to 15 rebounds per game and, in the last two, made 30 assists. To date he has held the Gaels together for a 9-4 record which includes only two home games.
EDWARD F. MARTIN
Saint Mary's College, Calif.

HOCKEY IN THE HEART
Sirs:
Thank God for culture and the Soviet-U.S. cultural exchange program. This program should not only be continued, it should be enlarged and strengthened.

True, the U.S. players took it on the chin in the hockey games (Clobbered for Culture, Jan. 16), but isn't it also possible that they took it in the heart, by getting to know their Soviet counterparts and seeing in them persons who are not unlike themselves?
WILLIAM JOHNSON
Warminster, Pa.

PAST AND PRESENT
Sirs:
Reading about Frank Lane's latest move as the new general manager of the Kansas City A's (FOR THE RECORD, Jan. 16) put me in mind of some old snapshots I thought I had. And when I went to look—sure enough, there they were: a picture of Lane I took 35 years ago and one of Baltimore Colts Coach Weeb Ewbank into the bargain. Here they are in case your readers would like to have a look.

Frank Lane was a rugged and exacting football and basketball referee in those days. But in my opinion (and not just because he tossed me out of a game on one occasion) he left much to be desired as a baseball umpire.

Weeb Ewbank was big league baseball material. I played with him at Miami University for three years, and believe me, he could do it all. He also handled himself with the best in basketball in that long gone era when small men were still allowed on the court. In football he was just another guy named Joe.
FREDERIC LATSCHA
Cincinnati

TWO PHOTOSFOOTBALL REFEREE FRANK LANE AND BALLPLAYER WEEB EWBANK WAY BACK WHEN