GOOD INTENTIONS
Sirs:
How prejudiced can you get? You petulantly and caustically state that "the players want open tennis; the public wants open tennis; everyone wants open tennis but the USLTA. Get out of the way, gentlemen" (SCORECARD, Feb. 13).

You completely ignored the fact that at its annual meeting in New Orleans this month the U.S. Lawn Tennis Association unanimously passed a resolution similar to the one it supported in 1960, requesting the International Federation to grant permission to any member nation to hold open tournaments in 1962. This matter will be voted on at the ILTF annual meeting in Stockholm on July 12, and the USLTA will do everything in its power to see that it passes.

Wake up, gentlemen, and stop this foolish belittling of the game of tennis.
WILLIAM S. KELLOGG
ILTF Committee of Management
La Jolla, Calif.

Sirs:
Get out of the way, SPORTS ILLUSTRATED.
EDWARD C. POTTER
Delray Beach, Fla.

•The road to better tennis is not necessarily paved with good intentions. It is still difficult to reconcile the USLTA's well-intended resolutions of this year and last with the statement of its president that "the number one need facing tennis in the world today is the restoration and preservation of amateurism in spirit and in fact."—ED.

Sirs:
I, for one, don't want open tennis. It would involve a mixture of too dissimilar classes.
ROLLIN W. WORKMAN
Cincinnati

OPEN SPORT
Sirs:
I believe that most people in this country would be delighted if we just had sports—with no distinction between amateur and professional whatever. The line drawn by the USLTA and the NCAA, Avery Brundage of the Olympics, Dan Ferris of the AAU, the heads of various college conferences and others is so indistinct and devious that many interpretations can be put upon the rules.

Some colleges give scholarships, bonuses, etc. to good football or basketball players, others do not. Some colleges and universities put on expensive drives to secure good athletes and others do not. The NCAA, the AAU, the various conferences and the colleges themselves cannot agree on their own rules. Is it any wonder that the average individual questions what it is all about but could not care less? The millions of people who attend the games and fill the coffers of the high schools and colleges pay to see two theoretically evenly matched teams play and to root for their favorite. They are not interested in the manner in which the players were recruited or whether or not some of them are good enough to draw bonuses for their brilliant play.

The average person who likes sport, such as basketball, football, baseball, tennis or track, likes it wherever and whenever it is within his reach, pays good money to see it and does not care a tinker's dam whether some people call it amateur or some call it professional.
W. D. KNAPP
Indianapolis

SHINE ON INGO
Sirs:
I see that your Martin Kane still has a shine on Ingemar Johansson as a boxer (New Ingo with a New Left, Feb. 13).

As an old boxing man, Mr. Kane ought to know that you can't teach old dogs new tricks. Ingemar is now 28 years old, he never had a left hook and he won't have one in his coming fight with Floyd. It will be the same old Ingo with only a right (and that one overrated, at that).
WARREN MURPHY
New York City

Sirs:
I am fed up. The first Ingo-Floyd ballyhoo was in order, the second shopworn, and now you devote the first six pages to a third-time warmup of the same.

When is this rematch, rematch, rematch to end?
JOHN H. VON HARTEN
Seattle

Sirs:
Mr. Kane dies hard, doesn't he?
MacDONALD STRINGHAM
Appleton, Wis.

NAUTICAL GAFF
Sirs:
I am not much of a nautical sage, but isn't it dirty pool to sail with ensign up (Cruising the Wine-dark Sea, Feb. 6)?
FRED HOWARD
Cambridge, Mass.

•On the contrary, all vessels, at anchor or under weigh, should display the national flag between sunup and sundown; however, a properly dressed schooner under sail should fly the ensign at the main peak or main gaff and not at the stern, as Aegean is doing in Paros harbor.—ED.

MYTH INFORMATION
Sirs:
I assume Martin Kane knew what he was talking about when he wrote, in reference to Johansson's training with dumbbells, "Most trainers believe that in time they bind muscles." This is an old trainers' tale.

The best evidence in opposition to the muscle-bound myth is found in a list of a few of weight training's better-known disciples: Rafer Johnson, Don Bragg, Bob Richards, Mai Whitfield, John Thomas, Parry O'Brien, Dallas Long, Dave Davis, Bill Nieder, Fortune Gordien, Al Oerter, Herb Elliott, John Landy, Bill Alley, Al Cantello, Billy Cannon, Alan Ameche, Pete Dawkins, Jackie Jensen, Ted Williams, John and Ilsa Konrads, Frank Stranahan, etc.

And still the myth lives on.
EDDIE FROST
Hobart, Okla.

NO, NO, NYET
Sirs:
I was appalled at your suggestion in SCORECARD (Feb. 13) to name the forthcoming New York entry in the National League the Giants and have our Giants revert to the old Pacific Coast League name, Seals (strictly minor league).

Since I am a San Franciscan and an avid rooter of our Giants now, I must confess I had never heard of Willie Mays or of any team other than the Yankees or Dodgers for years, since teen-age girls have better things to think about.

When the Giants began their glorious career in our city the players consisted mostly of rookies, so the name Giants really belongs to these young'uns who have captured our hearts.
MRS. RICHARD S. KORB
San Francisco

Sirs:
Why not call them the Nyets?

a) For purposes of easy identification, it incorporates the N.Y.

b) It is a convenient short form of "not yet."
H. B. GILBERT
Toronto, Ont.

SKIING FRONTIER
Sirs:
Regarding your recent article on Zermatt (Bright New Day for an Ancient Village, Jan. 23). we have just returned from a ski trip to Switzerland and Austria. We are sorry and apologetic for having contributed to the U.S. gold drain, but eager to reverse the trend. This could be done if the proposed U.S. Tourism Bureau informed skiers both here and abroad:

1) that our lift lines are much more orderly and patient than those in Europe;

2) that, unlike those abroad, our lifts run all day, daily, and without lunch breaks, even when there are only a few skiers around;

3) that U.S. ski patrols are, along with other virtues, easier to find. In Austria patrollers had no markings whatsoever on their jackets and did not wear first-aid belts; and in Switzerland you had to get real close to what looked like a native farmer with a small SOS on his hat to find out he was a patroller at all.

Let us make every effort to bring Europeans to the new frontier in U.S. skiing.
E. NOTTINGHAM
Stowe, Vt.

PHOTO"AEGEAN": CAUGHT WITH ENSIGN DOWN
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)