THE CHANGELESS BEAUTY OF A CHANGING GAME

April 10, 1961

The once immutable aspect of baseball is changing now, and rapidly. This season brand-new teams of rather old men will represent the American League in Los Angeles and Washington, the old Washington Senators having migrated to Minnesota. For all that change, baseball is the same. The split-second grace of a batter's swing or a pitcher's delivery, the familiar swooping, turning movement of an infielder starting a double play—all will ornament the game again. Here and on the following pages, in color and black-and-white photographs, are some of the chief artisans of baseball's timeless beauty.

ELROY FACE
The doughty little relief pitcher of the world champion Pittsburgh Pirates throws every ball with all his small might, his body quivering after the pitch like a just-fired catapult.

ROGER MARIS
The Most Valuable Player in his league last year shows the level power of his swing, his strong body perfectly graceful in the aftermath of a home run.

MILT PAPPAS
Cap pushed back, hair tousled, the devil-may-care young right-hander who pitches for the lively young Baltimore Orioles grins cheerful defiance at the world.

VIC POWER
The Cleveland Indians' flashy star takes off for first base after a hit, his face set in a thin grin. He has speed, flamboyance, style, and extraordinary competence as well.

BROOKS ROBINSON
Baltimore's fine young All-Star third baseman creates one of the classic positions in the familiar choreography of baseball, his body stretched in a long, clean line of effort. He missed here; he doesn't miss often.

MICKEY MANTLE
The New York Yankees' slugger is also an exceptionally deft bunter. Here he is away in a driving sprinter's start, the ball barely off the bat as he takes his first step.

MINNIE MINOSO
He swings with utter violence—and misses with utter finality. Because of this complete and daring commitment, even a Minoso strikeout has unforgettable flair.

KEN BOYER
The big man of the St. Louis Cardinals squints into the sun, his strong face reflecting the quiet confidence of the superb athlete—a fearsome hitter, an almost impeccable fielder.

DICK GROAT
The shortstop and captain of the World Champion Pittsburgh Pirates, batting champion of the National League and Most Valuable Player in the league, is the nearest thing to an indispensable man on the talent-rich Pirate roster.

FRANK HOWARD
The huge Dodger outfielder may be the most powerful batter who ever lived. His boyish face belies the fact that he is 6 feet 7 inches tall, weighs 245 pounds.

WHITEY FORD
One of the shrewdest pitchers in baseball, he is thoughtful and still as he ponders his continuing problem, the next pitch, the next batter, the next game.

ELEVEN PHOTOS

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)