ST. LOUIS CARDINALS

Elderly Stan Musial's bat helps the Cardinal attack, but his aging legs weaken outfield defense—which typifies the Cards' problem of nonfielding hitters
April 10, 1961

ANALYSIS OF THE CARDINALS

STRONG POINTS
There are several: sound power-hitting infield, deep pitching staff headed by two of league's best in Ernie Broglio (21-9), Larry Jackson (18-13). Relief Pitcher Lindy McDaniel appeared in 65 games last year, won 12, lost four and saved 27 for best relief record in majors. Recovery of Bob Miller adds potential 15-game winner; veteran Curt Simmons and Ray Sadecki (9-9 in first year) provide left-handed starters. Ken Boyer is one of the two best third basemen in baseball (Eddie Mathews is the other). His considerable power is supplemented by Daryl Spencer at short and Bill White at first. Second Baseman Julian Javier hit .237 last year, but steals bases, scores runs, provides strong defense. Red Schoendienst, home and happy, is fine utility man.

WEAK SPOTS
Outfield, left-handed relief pitching. Only in right field do the Cardinals have a player (Joe Cunningham) who combines good batting with fair fielding. In left, Stan Musial and Bob Nieman hit well, field poorly. In center, Curt Flood has speed, arm and glove, but hit .237 last year. Walt Moryn adds fair power to outfield, but is only adequate on defense.

THE BIG IFS
Stan Musial is 40, although he did not look or act it in spring training. Last year, for two months, he was the Stan Musial of old, and his hitting carried the team. He is being counted on to hit as well again; much depends on how many games he can play well. Daryl Spencer is a useful batter, but is not a good fielder. "Spencer is a second-division defensive player," one scout says. "He'll make the routine play, not the big one." Larry Jackson broke jaw in training. His loss, for at least two weeks, will slow team's start. Ernie Broglio's 21-game season was a distinct, and welcome, surprise last year. Cards assume he'll be a big winner again. He had better be.

ROOKIES AND NEW FACES
Don Landrum, up from Buffalo, may solve center-field problem; he hit well in International League, is fleet, sure fly catcher. Al Cicotte, who has bounced around baseball since 1948, is back for his fifth try at the majors. He earned this shot after leading the International League in ERA (1.79), shutouts (8), strikeouts (158) and victories (16). "I finally learned to pitch," Al says, "and my fast ball came back."

OUTLOOK
Manager Solly Hemus parlayed luck and extraordinary performances from several players to lift the Cardinals to a third-place finish last year; he will need a good deal more of both to finish that high again.

26 RUNS FOR A CHAMPIONSHIP

Solly Hemus, the manager of the Cardinals, is a man much given to introspection and second guessing. "We could have won the National League championship last year," he says. "All we needed was 26 more runs batted in by our outfielders." Solly is an honest man and he believes this. "We got lots of power from left field," he went on. "But Nieman carried us there for a couple of months, and when he pulled a muscle, I put Stan Musial in. Stan hit 17 homers, and he drove in lots of runs. But we didn't get enough from center and right. All together, we only got 196 runs batted in last year from the outfield. I figure with this club, I got to have at least 220 runs batted in. We'd need even more than that if we didn't have solid power hitters like Boyer, White and Spencer in the infield. What we may have to do this year is carry seven outfielders on the roster—three for defense and four for offense."

Ken Boyer is a superb third baseman. He hits .300 and fields magnificently. But on one play this spring, he looked like a busher. The batter hit the ball on a low, screaming line between Ken and the base line, a very difficult fielding chance, not the sort of chance an established star is going to break his back to get in a meaningless spring training game. Boyer reached with his glove, turned his head away and hoped. Harry Walker, in the third-base coaching box, put his head back and laughed. He mimicked a bullfighter passing a bull in the paso de pecho, both hands to his right, his head turned away from the horns. "Olé," said Harry.

"I've got to make it big this year," said 31-year-old Al Cicotte, who is up from Toronto trying for the fifth time to stick with a major league baseball club. "I'm an insurance salesman in the off season. I sold $800,000 worth of insurance in three months last year. But if I could be a big major league player for a while, I could sell a whole lot more. I need the name."

"A .220 hitter in the minors will be a .220 hitter all his life," said Marty Marion, a special coach for shortstops. "Most hitting is in your reflexes. You can't improve them. But you can do a few things. I thought of myself as a glove man when I came up. Then I decided to be a hitter. The big thing I did was to study the pitchers, so I would know what they might be expected to throw in a given situation. I was pretty tough with the bat my last few years up." In other words, it isn't all reflex. A hitter can learn. Bill White, the Cardinal first baseman, has profited from the instructions of Harry Walker. "White used to jerk his head away, and he didn't wait to see the pitch," Walker says. "Now he waits. He'll be a hell of a hitter this year."

Sonny Randle, a sprinter turned pro football player, worked with all the Cardinals this spring, teaching them how to run faster. Not how to steal bases—just how to run fast. Most apt pupil was Catcher Hal Smith, who now figures he's a step faster to first base than before.

"A half step is enough," says Hemus, the Cardinal manager. "A half step a game for 154 games means—how many runs? Thirty? Could be the difference."

THE FRONT OFFICE
Anheuser-Busch, Inc. owns the Cardinals, and August Anheuser Busch Jr. carefully points out that he is merely the club's president. Ebullient Gussie bought the club in 1953, freely admits team helps beer sales. At 61, Gussie is less active than when he first took over club and worked out at spring training. Skilled, quiet Vaughan P. (Bing) Devine, 43, replaced the bombastic Frank Lane as GM in 1957, has grown in stature through smart trades and last year's surprising third-place finish. Walter Shannon runs farm organization (Cardinals originated the farm system), has it producing again. Executive VP Dick Meyer serves as sort of liaison between Busch and Devine. Ed Stanky, less brash than in his playing and managing days, is troubleshooter and special adviser to Devine on player trades.

THE BALL PARK
A new 55,000-seat stadium is on drawing boards for 1964, but until then Cards stay in 80-year-old Busch Stadium (30,500 capacity), formerly Sportsman's Park. Good bus, streetcar service; most fans drive to special points, park, ride express buses to field. Not much parking near stadium. Only ball park with draught beer; paper-cupful (Boss Busch's kind and others) sells for 25¢. Hot dogs (30¢) very popular because they're grilled instead of boiled. Scoreboard still follows pleasant old custom of posting inning-by-inning line scores of out-of-town games. Busch Stadium has longest dugouts in baseball, plush loge boxes ($2,750 season) with elevator service, waiters, plugs for phone, radio, refrigerator. Ground crew laboring to have grass—ruined last fall by first season of pro football in St. Louis (NFL's Cardinals)—ready for Opening Day

[originallink:10504291:43610]

PHOTOJULIAN JAVIER PHOTOBILL WHITE PHOTOLINDY McDANIEL PHOTOERNIE BROGLIO ILLUSTRATIONBILL CHARMATZ

1960 TEAM PERFORMANCE

FINISHED

WON

LOST

GAMES BEHIND

3

86

68

9

1960 INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCES

BATTING

PITCHING

Boyer

.304

Broglio

21-9

Nieman

.287

Jackson

18-13

White

.283

McDaniel

12-4

HOME RUNS

RUNS BATTED IN

Boyer

32

Boyer

97

Musial

17

White

79

Spencer

16

Musial

63

White

16

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)