19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

April 17, 1961

NEW TRIER'S NEIGHBORS
Sirs:
Arlie Schardt's Big Noise from Winnetka (SI, April 3) was tremendous. New Trier deserved the honors, and it should show the rest of the high school boys the country over that boys can do a man's job, too.
ALBERT SCHOENFIELD
North Hollywood, Calif.

Sirs:
Perhaps the greatest factor in New Trier's success is the fierce competition afforded it by neighboring archrival Evanston High School.

When these two powerhouses meet head on there are more college coaches than spectators watching the action, and records fall like ten pins.
DAN PETERSON
Evanston, Ill.

Sirs:
...Evanston Coach Burton's saga is made even more compelling by the fact that he didn't start with the "biggest indoor pool in the country." Instead Burton inherited a nominally interested group of basketball and football players just filling out their spring sport elective and a frothy YMCA pool located two miles from the school to work them in.
HARRY FULLER
The Dalles, Ore.

Sirs:
The only prep swim team in the nation that could beat New Trier is Los Altos High School. The big star at Los Altos is Steve Clark, who set two national marks at the AAU meet in New Haven (An Even Dozen in the Yale Pool, April 10).

Steve is the top student in the school and president of the student body as well.
DICK O'CONNOR
Palo Alto, Calif.

CALL HIM CARL
Sirs:
Thanks for the great article on Carl Yastrzemski, one of the brightest young stars ever to come from Long Island ("In Left Field for Boston...," April 3). You might be interested to know that while in high school Carl set a Suffolk County basketball scoring record that has yet to be broken.
JOHN KARANIK JR.
Huntington Station, N.Y.

Sirs:
It was about time someone printed a pronunciation guide for that upcoming headliner Carl Yastrzemski. Congratulations for being the first.
TED ROSEN JR.
Manchester, Conn.

ALIAS MITTY
Sirs:
George Plimpton's Dream of Glory on the Mound (April 10) was a dream (or nightmare) come true for all of us frustrated Walter Mittys. But who is this guy who for "reasons of his own" could actually put his dream to the test and tell of it so effectively? Is he a famed athlete in disguise?
ROBERT GAY
New York City

•Far from it. The doughty Mr. Plimpton, son of a prominent New York lawyer, banker and philanthropist, is himself a graduate of Phillips Exeter Academy and Harvard (1948), where he was an eager intramural pitcher as he also was in the Army. He is a jack-of-all-journalism with a weakness for basic research. His work has appeared often in these pages (The Vanderbilt Story, Oct. 15, 1956, et seq.), and his other literary accomplishments include helping to found and edit the avant-garde Paris Review in France.—ED.

BLACK AND WHITE TV
Sirs:
What's with this bilge about the Redskins' "southern TV network might suffer" if they employ Negro players (SCORE-CARD, April 3)? I dare say Big Daddy Lipscomb has as large a Birmingham following as Eddie LeBaron ever had.
CLAY N. WELLS
Birmingham

CAPITAL GAME
Sirs:
I realize this is belated, but I would like Jack Olsen to know that his fine tract, The Pool Hustlers (SI, March 20), omits certain items concerning New York City in the early '30s, when swarms of the unemployed filled the pool halls in search of an extra dollar to bring home.

Most famous hangout of hustlers anywhere probably was Skibooch's place upstairs in the old Capital Theatre building during the heyday of big-time vaudeville. A visit here anytime between 2 a.m. and 8 a.m. was better than any show in town, as the cream of the hustling racket gathered to compare notes on their pickings. Once in a great while, and only after hours of tedious wrangling over the delicate balance of the proper odds, a match (oh joy to watch!) would be arranged between such immortals as Frenchy, Gloversville Joe, Fats Daly or Pete the Swede. The original sawbuck at issue was soon overshadowed by the numerous side bets along the ancient benches, and a truly historic event would surely ensue.

One-pocket, eight-ball and nine-ball were too simple for the boys in Skibooch's, who would condescend to battle only in a) cribbage (15-point game; pocketing two successive balls adding up to 15 equals one point) or b) bank pool, as described by Olsen, but on a 6-by-12 snooker table.
WM. SMITH O'BRIEN
Huntington, N.Y.

GOING GAME
Sirs:
You can number me as the 5,001st American devotee of the 4,000-year-old Chinese game of go (SCORECARD, April 3). I have my go board and my "stones" ready, but I need a rule book. Please tell me where I can get one.
JIM PLZAK
Washington, D.C.

•From the American Go Association, 96 Cedar Avenue, Hackensack, N.J. Price 25¢.—ED.

BOOM BOOM'S BONANZA
Sirs:
As a follow-up to your Stanley Cup tally (SCORECARD, March 20) and your article Snap, Crackle and Boom Boom (March 27), it is interesting to note that Winger Bernie (Boom Boom) Geoffrion will reap $1,000 for gaining the Art Ross Trophy (leading scorer), $1,000 for placing on the first all-star team, an additional $2,000 in bonus money ($100 every goal scored over 30, promised by Coach Toe Blake), $1,000 for team's first-place finish and then any additional money picked up in the scramble for hockey's biggest prize, the Stanley Cup. Boom Boom in effect could grab almost $10,000 in bonus funds.
BOB LEWIS
Montreal

RIGHTED ROUNDUP
Sirs:
Several months ago you printed an article by Ed Zern on the big-prize angling derbies that are ruining the sport of fishing ("I Loathe and Detest All Fish Tournaments," Nov. 7). Zern "pointed his finger" at the St. Petersburg Jaycee Tarpon Roundup as a bad example of a big-money, no-sportsmanship tournament.

This image has long bothered the St. Petersburg Jaycees. Our Roundup Committee has, for almost a year, been drafting changes, and we are pleased to announce that in this year's roundup, May 13 to July 29, we are presenting trophies instead of weekly cash awards, in order to attract real sportsmen rather than prize-seekers.
HARDY L. PAYOR
St. Petersburg, Fla.

GAMESMANSHIP
Sirs:
I beg to disagree with the conclusions reached in your editorial on bribery in basketball (March 27). The corrupt atmosphere in sport is not the result of the environment but of the games themselves. The modern concept of coaches and players alike seems to be a matter of finding ways of circumventing the rules or deceiving the umpire or the referee. "Gamesmanship" now connotes subterfuge, evasion, cunning, deceit, fakery and general dishonesty.
HORACE W. ROBINSON
Eugene, Ore.

PHOTOPITCHER PLIMPTON AT HIS USUAL WORK

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)