19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

April 30, 1961

SHANNON'S PANTS
Sirs:
Kudos to SPORTS ILLUSTRATED and Barbara Heilman for the excellent and penetrating article on Shannon Brown and St. Stephen's (Farewell to Shannon Brown, April 3). Yes, there is hope for our Indians there. Faults they have, as we all do, but they have two outstanding traits for which I came to love them very much: simplicity and guilelessness. This I know. I taught at St. Stephen's for three years—and sewed up Shannon's trunks the night they split!
LEWIS B. O'NEIL, S.J.
Los Gatos, Calif.

HAWKEYE AND THE HALL
Sirs:
If Oriole Manager Paul Richards (Hawkeye and his Boy Scouts, April 17) wins the pennant with the outfield he has assembled, he will certainly be elected to baseball's Hall of Fame.
TOM MAGUIRE
New Orleans

Sirs:
If there ever is a sportswriter's hall of fame, Roy Terrell should be the first to be chosen. His article on Paul Richards was truly great.
CHARLES INFANTINO
Buffalo

FISH STORY
Sirs:
The paintings by Thomas B. Allen for the article on Golden Gate Fishing (April 17), especially the one on the cover, are breathtaking. Mr. Allen somehow captures the heart of fishing, in his vivid colors and striking contrasts, as its participants see it.
ALAN RADER
White Plains, N.Y.

Sirs:
As an ex-editor of a local fishing and hunting weekly, I want to protest the story on Bay area fishing. Not only is the fishing poor where your author claims it good, but the best fishing in the area is left out of the story altogether. In my opinion, far and away the best fishing comes from rockfish and ling cod taken in limited proportions the year round off the coast just south of San Francisco.
BOB WOOD
San Francisco

CONGO BOUND
Sirs:
When your feature on Naval Chief Petty Officer Lew Lalak (PAT ON THE BACK, April 3) came to our attention here in the Bureau of Naval Personnel we took steps to procure basketballs and equipment for the chief to use in the Congo. But, before we could do so, the Voit Rubber Corporation made us a donation of a dozen basketballs, two goals and two inflaters. This equipment has now been airlifted to Leopoldville for Chief Lalak.

The universal appeal, and language, of sports has prevailed once again.
W. R. SMEDBERG III
Vice Admiral, USN
Washington, D.C.

CROWD OF THE YEAR
Sirs:
Now suppose—just suppose—that the Chicago Cubs do win the 1961 National League pennant (The Cubs and All Their Coaches, April 10). Eight managers of the year?
BOB GELLMAN
New York City

A HAND FOR BOGEY
Sirs:
Certainly nothing but praise should be tendered to the memory of Humphrey Bogart for his brilliant analysis and play of the hand illustrated in Charles Goren's column (The Best in Bridge, April 10). But West has only himself to blame for allowing Mr. Bogart (South) to effect this bit of subterfuge and make his contract.

Both sides vulnerable, West dealer

NORTH

[10 of Spades]
[9 of Spades]
[8 of Spades]
[2 of Spades]
[7 of Hearts]
[5 of Hearts]
[2 of Hearts]
[Ace of Diamonds]
[Jack of Diamonds]
[8 of Diamonds]
[6 of Diamonds]
[3 of Diamonds]
[King of Clubs]

EAST

[Ace of Spades]
[King of Spades]
[7 of Spades]
[6 of Spades]
[4 of Spades]
[3 of Spades]
[Queen of Hearts]
[Jack of Hearts]
[9 of Hearts]
[8 of Hearts]
[4 of Hearts]
[4 of Diamonds]
[5 of Clubs]

SOUTH

[Queen of Spades]
[Jack of Spades]
[5 of Spades]
[6 of Hearts]
[3 of Hearts]
[10 of Diamonds]
[2 of Diamonds]
[Ace of Clubs]
[Queen of Clubs]
[10 of Clubs]
[6 of Clubs]
[3 of Clubs]
[2 of Clubs]

WEST

[— of Spades]
[Ace of Hearts]
[King of Hearts]
[10 of Hearts]
[King of Diamonds]
[Queen of Diamonds]
[9 of Diamonds]
[7 of Diamonds]
[5 of Diamonds]
[Jack of Clubs]
[9 of Clubs]
[8 of Clubs]
[7 of Clubs]
[4 of Clubs]

WEST

1 [Diamond]
DOUBLE

NORTH

PASS
PASS

EAST

1 [Spade]
PASS

SOUTH

2 [Club]
PASS

Opening lead: king of hearts

On the opening lead of the heart king, East's play of the queen demands that partner underlead his ace at trick two. West should therefore lead out his 10, which East overtakes with the jack. East then should return the ace and king of spades, on which West discards the heart ace and a small diamond. A third spade-lead by East gives West a club ruff, and defense has book. West then exits with the diamond king, which is taken with dummy's ace.

The hands now are as follows:

NORTH

[10 of Spades]
[7 of Hearts]
[Jack of Diamonds]
[8 of Diamonds]
[6 of Diamonds]
[3 of Diamonds]
[King of Clubs]

EAST

[7 of Spades]
[6 of Spades]
[4 of Spades]
[9 of Hearts]
[8 of Hearts]
[4 of Hearts]
[— of Diamonds]
[5 of Clubs]

SOUTH

[— of Spades]
[— of Hearts]
[10 of Diamonds]
[Ace of Clubs]
[Queen of Clubs]
[10 of Clubs]
[6 of Clubs]
[3 of Clubs]
[2 of Clubs]

WEST

[— of Spades]
[— of Hearts]
[Queen of Diamonds]
[9 of Diamonds]
[7 of Diamonds]
[Jack of Clubs]
[9 of Clubs]
[8 of Clubs]
[7 of Clubs]

Declarer now has no play from dummy, which will avoid the loss of the setting trick to defense. In fact, unless dummy leads the spade 10 and South discards the diamond 10, or makes this play after cashing the club king, defense can take two tricks.
JOSEPH GRYSON
San Francisco

•"The point," says Card Editor Goren, "is well taken, for any expert defender would indeed underlead the heart at trick two."—ED.

THE NON-PROS
Sirs:
Having been a member of the almost extinct group of American amateur jai alai players, I am very interested in New York Jai Alai's pronounced intentions to teach the sport to American youngsters (SCORECARD, April 10).

A near fatal blow to the development of American Jai Alai players occurred around 1957 when an amateur was seriously injured at the Miami Jai Alai frontón. Since then, most frontóns have refused to allow amateur play.

I hope that Sally will not deviate from his plan.
DAVID H. KATZ
Ann Arbor, Mich.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)