19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

May 07, 1961

WOMBSTERS
Sirs:
Before I read Robert Boyle's clinical report on hot rods (The Car Cult from Rumpsville, April 24) I told myself the pleasure which I derived from building, tuning and driving our roadster had something to do with creativity or, perhaps, expression of individuality. Now I see the folly of my rationalization. Mr. Boyle has shown me that when I drive that erotic roadster I'm really returning to the womb. Many thanks for setting me straight.
ARNOLD SHUMAN
Sharon, Mass.

Sirs:
Your cover story represents a very welcome recognition of hot rodding as the major sport it has come to be.
JAMES R. WYLIE
Belvidere, Ill.

Sirs:
As a club of true hot rodders we Road Gents have been trying to change public opinion about hot rodding through courtesy and assistance on the road. Your article has done us a great deal of justice and is deeply appreciated.
GEORGE STONE
Brooklyn

Sirs:
During the past winter a basketball player named Frank Burgess of Gonzaga led all the NCAA colleges in scoring, yet SPORTS ILLUSTRATED carried nothing about him (except a brief listing buried in BASKETBALL'S WEEK, April 3).

When the current issue, by contrast, devotes 16 pages to glamorizing a movement and a bunch of morons whose set of values belongs with the zombies, I begin to wonder about your own set of values.

You have done some fine things—why ruin your effectiveness with such disgusting articles as this one?
GEORGE I. WERNER
Spokane

Sirs:
This isn't sport. It isn't even civilized.
DON WARD
Indianapolis

Sirs:
Congratulations on putting together the biggest amount of tripe and unmitigated innuendo since the Communist Manifesto.
DANIEL PAAR
La Crosse, Wis.

Sirs:
My car recently stalled on a lonely country road. Soon a car of teen-age boys stopped, diagnosed the problem and assisted me into the nearest community. Ever since then I have been a believer that rodders can be courteous as well as talented.
BEVERLY E. LLOYD
Estacada, Ore.

CONSERVATIVE CULTIST
REQUEST INFORMATION HOW ONE SENATOR BARRY GOLDWATER CAN CLAIM TO BE CONSERVATIVE AND HAVE AUTOMOBILE AS DESCRIBED IN YOUR ISSUE DATED APRIL 24, 1961.
DR. E. W. ALLEN JR.
MACON, GA.

•Senator Goldwater, who also is an amateur jet pilot, claims his interest in gadgets is not incompatible with the conservative philosophy. "The conservatives," says the junior Senator from Arizona, "apply proved values of the past to make the best possible use of the most modern devices in the development of man."—ED.

PRIMARY PITCHER
Sirs:
Your article on Opening Day (A Change after 60 Years, April 24) has raised a question in my mind. Who was the first U.S. President to open a baseball season, and what was the date?
JACK MORRISON
Timonium, Md.

•William Howard Taft in 1910 (see left).—ED.

PLANE SAILING
Sirs:
Heartiest congratulations on your excellent series on planing boats and the 5-0-5s (A New Dimension in Sailing, April 3 and 24). I particularly enjoyed O'Day's righting technique. Especially since I have "been there" quite a few times myself.

Having sailed for some 20 years in many classes, I find the 5-0-5 by far the most thrilling. As you have stated, an occasional capsize is inevitable, but the 5-0-5 is one of the very few boats designed to be self-rescuing.
E. LOGAN GOAR
Houston

LEMON AID
Sirs:
If any Minnesota Twins fans are "spurring Bob Lemon...to outdistance Ruth" (SCORECARD, April 24) then they certainly are misguided rooters. It had better be Jim Lemon hitting the homers if the team is to make the first division.
HERBERT A. GRIES JR.
Wailuku, Hawaii

PHOTOPRESIDENT TAFT AT 1910 OPENING DAY

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)