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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

May 15, 1961
May 15, 1961

Table of Contents
May 15, 1961

Derby
Odds And Dolls
Tough Cookie
Tire Salesman
Boxing
Boating
Hurley
Baseball's Week
Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

TALE OF TWIN CITIES
Sirs:
Let's face it. It's men like Walter Bingham who perpetuate the old romantic idea of a feud between the Twin Cities (No Feud like an old Feud, May 1). One may certainly find people and statements that show discord, but I can assure you that feelings axe better today than they ever have been.
ALLAN D. GODFREY
Minneapolis

This is an article from the May 15, 1961 issue Original Layout

Sirs:
Minneapolis and St. Paul are forgetting past differences. This is our ball club.
RAY G. MOCK
St. Paul

Sirs:
If it's an error on the part of promoters to whip up interest in a dead Twin Cities' sporting event (baseball), then forget your original intent—sports for sports alone—and let your wonderful writers turn their journalistic efforts to more "big-citified" achievements, such as covering "big-time" gambling (your locale) on "provincial" games.
MRS. JOHN A. PRICE
Minneapolis

Sirs:
Any lack of resounding fan response was due, in my humble opinion, not to division between St. Paul and Minneapolis, but to extremely poor publicity and insufficient accommodations.

Metropolitan Stadium is not in the most favorable location possible. Of nine parking lots at the stadium, only two had been paved by opening day.

April in Minnesota, by and large, is not baseball weather. Saturday was excellent, but Sunday (attendance 13,408) was as cold and miserable a day as you could find at this time of the year.
THE REV. QUINTIN F. KENNEDY
St. Paul

Sirs:
You have published an article written apparently by a master propagandist by name of Walter Bingham. Most of his statements are true but, like most propaganda, they are incomplete.

The animosity between the Twin Cities is that of brothers. Things are always lively in a sporting way between us, but events of quality are supported by both cities regardless of location.
HARRY HOGAN
Minneapolis

SHARP PUP
Sirs:
If that dog Peggy is so smart (A Few Questions for a Poodle Named Peg, April 24), why doesn't she teach people to speak dog instead of monkeying around with all that card jazz?
MARTHA NELSON
South Lancaster, Mass.

Sirs:
The explanation of Peg's powers must be an extrasensory one. No dog could master the human language as Peg has by training alone.
JOE FAGOT
Atherton, Calif.

Sirs:
Several years ago I was introduced to a 5-year-old female collie on a wheat farm near Spokane.

Her owner thoroughly shuffled a deck of ordinary playing cards, face cards having been removed, and dealt 12 of them face down on the floor. As he pointed at each card at random, Chum correctly barked the number of spots—without a miss, as we discovered in turning over each card in turn after she had tallied it for us.
ROD KLISE
Great Falls, Mont.

•A marked deck?—ED.

SHOCKING PINK
Sirs:
The West Hills Hunt has "happily fractured tradition" in more ways than one (Pink Coals in the Sage, May 8). The hunting scarlet coat is worn by women only if they are lady masters. I can detect at least two scarlet-coated ladies, and neither appears to be the M.F.H.

And what would Mr. Jorrocks say to a master, like John Bowles, who dodges the panel for the gate?
D. ATWELL ZOLL
Knoxville, Tenn.

•Hunting tradition generally frowns on pink for ladies, but it also gives the master the right to decide what his hunt shall wear. As for that jump: for the fate of one who tried it, see above.—ED.

PHOTOHUNTSMAN WHOSE MOUNT DID NOT REFUSE JUMP ENDS UP, LIKE HIS HORSE, IN DUST