19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

July 09, 1961

FAT IN THE FIRE
Sirs:
Herb Elliott's bitter blast at America's physical softness was rude and distressing (Americans Are Mollycoddles, June 26). It also was true.
FRANK WORBS
Beaver, Pa.

Sirs:
A delightful and enchanting expose of a sportsman's interpretations of American people and their hospitality both on and off the battlefield.
IRA B. HARKEY III
New Orleans

Sirs:
As I remember it, the neighborhood kid who always ran the farthest in the shortest time usually did so because someone was chasing him. This by no means made him superior in every way.

Since Mr. Elliott is no longer running as much as he used to, he has obviously found another and far less commendable outlet for his overdeveloped lungs.
TOM SAFFEN
Ann Arbor, Mich.

Sirs:
Herb Elliott shot an arrow into the air, but he knows where it landed—smack-dab in the gut of the flabby American. Sadly, his shots, most of which were right on target, will be ignored or rationalized by too many fat-bellied and fatheaded Americans.
LEO W. FLANAGAN
Chicago

Sirs:
Why doesn't Mr. Elliott take a good look at some of the athletes we have produced and the ones we are now producing? After all, track isn't the only sport there is.
THOMAS JONES
Donora, Pa.

Sirs:
A typical example of a critical foreigner—they don't have anything good to say about us, but they sure like to take our money home with them. I would like to offer Mr. Elliott a suggestion—stay home if we're too soft for you.
WILLIAM T. HILL JR.
Minneapolis

Sirs:
You have done a public service by publishing his statements.
ROBERT V. ELY
Roswell, N. Mex.

NO NEW BOBBY?
Sirs:
Did the British purposely schedule their Amateur the weekend of our Open to prevent another American from making a Grand Slam?
HENRIETTA RYAN
New York City

•British golf authorities were trying to avoid May rain when they switched the tournament to June. Since few American amateurs in recent years have bothered to try for a Grand Slam, the British were both surprised and flattered by the concern over the unintentional conflict in dates. It won't, they vow, happen again.—ED.

MAIM WE MUST
Sirs:
After reading The Oriental Martial Art of Karate (June 26) I must say that I was shocked. It is quite obvious that Mr. Price has very little knowledge of the martial arts, and even less of karate. It is of course true that karate is dangerous and if used in the wrong way can kill or maim, but let us not forget that that is its purpose. It is not a parlor game for gentlemen, nor has it the rules of boxing. It is a method of self-defense, and if in defending one's life one must maim or kill another human being, so be it. It is also one of the best methods for becoming physically fit.
ROBERT A. BOGORFF
Flushing, N.Y.

•Or physically dead.—ED.

Sirs:
As a karate player of many years' experience, it seems my duty to educate Mr. Price to the fact that karate, in its true meaning, can certainly never be learned with any degree of potentiality from a book, any book, even of the highest caliber.
CHARLES RITTENBERRY
Amarillo, Texas

Sirs:
My sincere congratulations go to Roger Price. His article contained as much truth as humor. Incidentally, I am still laughing,
O. JAY FUERST
Whittemore, Mich.

Sirs:
A scream!
T. J. MARIETTA
East Lansing, Mich.

SWEEP AND SHELL
Sirs:
Oliver La Farge's Flame on the River (June 19), was one of the most understanding pieces we've ever read about rowing.

This distinguished gentleman has managed to set down for posterity the very meaning of that wonderful world of sweep and shell. It should be required reading for all prospective oarsmen.
CRAIG SWAYZE
St. Catherines, Ont.

'RAY FOR RAY
Sirs:
In his article, The Young Pitchers Take Command (June 26), Tex Maule neglected one of the National League's great young pitchers. At 20, Ray Sadecki has put in one fine season, and has started on another. At this point he has seven complete games, and an earned run average of less than 3.00. When Warren Spahn is gone, this young pitcher will be the standout left-hander of the National League.
DALE S. BOURDETTE
Milan, Pa.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)