19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

August 13, 1961

THE RECORD
Sirs:
Walter Bingham's Assault on the Record (July 31) said something that has needed saying for some time. His realistic attitude is commendable.
JOHN C. HENDRICKSON
Dayton, Ohio

Sirs:
Congratulations to Walter Bingham for his assault on the record—worst article I've ever read.
LAWRENCE H. DOYLE
Birmingham, Mich.

Sirs:
Bingham states that "a season is a season, no matter how many games are played." That is tantamount to saying that a horse circling a six-furlong track in 1:30 is better than one circling a mile track in 1:35. Really, I can't believe you're serious about printing this guy's stuff.
R. W. DERINGER
Allentown, Pa.

Sirs:
Under Bingham's theory a 100-yard-dash man could breast the finish tape first, but if a second runner passed him five yards beyond the finish line the second man would be the winner.

Possibly Bingham should try out for the State Department in Washington, where his type of pseudo dialectics is more in demand.
C. C. MINOR
Decatur, Ill.

Sirs:
After all, "a season is a season," but 155 games are 155 games.
JOHN ORBAN
Cheltenham, Pa.

Sirs:
I predict that Mickey Mantle and Roger Maris will hit 65 HRs each to power Whitey Ford to a 38-game season as the Tigers win the pennant.
BOB CLARK
Ann Arbor, Mich.

Sirs:
At the rate of 3.44 at bats per game, the rate he set last season, Mickey Mantle will be at bat 557 times this season in 162 games. This is only 17 more at bats than Ruth had in 1927 in 151 games.

On the other hand, Roger Maris, at last year's rate of 3.67 at bats per game, will bat 595 times in 162 games. In the 50 to 60 extra at bats. Maris can hit as many as seven or eight home runs.

Nevertheless, it is my belief that the eight extra games should be valid as far as the record is concerned; many batters have been at bat at least 595 times in a 154-game season, so why should it make any difference in a 162-game season?
JOEL D. TAUROG
Dallas

MODELING CLAY
Sirs:
Did you ever get the feeling that that so-called "fistic marvel" Cassius Clay (Fast Talk and a Slow Fight, July 31) is merely being built up for the biggest letdown since Primo Carnera?
ED ASMIR
El Paso

Sirs:
If Cassius Clay wants a crack at Floyd Patterson and the heavyweight championship, he'd better be a better boxer than he thinks he is.
DAVE McCOY
Altoona, Pa.

FIT CHALLENGE
IN SPITE OF NASTY CRACKS AT THE PEOPLE WHO WILL HAVE TO DO THE LARGE SHARE OF THE WORK I THOUGHT MUNGER WROTE WELL ABOUT THE FITNESS PROGRAM (Challenge to Bud Wilkinson, July 31). HOPE WILKINSON AND KENNEDY GET THE POINT.
DEL T. BERTEUFFER
PROFESSOR OF PHYSICAL EDUCATION
OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY
COLUMBUS, OHIO

Sirs:
I see no flabby kids in my neighborhood.
STEPHEN CALLAGHAN
Atlanta, Ga.

Sirs:
With pediatricians, psychiatrists and some educators condemning sports for junior high school students because of the emotional trauma and exploitation, it is refreshing to see Mr. Munger's comments. I have found that those national leaders who criticize athletics have never played any sports themselves.
FRANK E. BARNES JR., M.D.
Smithfield, N.C.

HOW PROUDLY DO WE HAIL?
Sirs:
It has become increasingly disturbing to me to hear the traditional rendition of our national anthem before athletic contests played at a rushed, let's-get-this-necessary-evil-over-in-a-hurry tempo, and to see many athletes and fans treat it in such a lackadaisical manner.

When played properly and given the proper attention, The Star-Spangled Banner is a most inspiring piece.

In these days of materialism and the lowering of our adherence to many of our hard-earned principles and heritages to the level of lip service, mention of this situation in SPORTS ILLUSTRATED might help restore at least this one tradition to its deserved position of respect and inspiration.
WESLEY H. BEATTIE
Melrose, Mass.

RED RAINBOW
Sirs:
A note of appreciation for SCORECARD'S comments on "Voice of the Reds" (July 3). The question now, of course, is will success spoil Waite Hoyt?
MRS. JACK NUTTER
Newark, Ohio

Sirs:
More power to the Redlegs, but I think that the faults of Mr. Hoyt far outweigh his virtues as a baseball announcer. We don't look forward to games interrupted by rain to enjoy his announcing.
EDWARD E. CINCOSKI, S.J.
Milford, Ohio

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)