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Contents

Sept. 04, 1961
Sept. 04, 1961

Table of Contents
Sept. 4, 1961

Cover
Senators
Pennant Race
Solvent Vikings
Strokes And Style
Double Play
Horse Racing
Fishing
Automobiles
C. V. Whitney
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

Contents

Strange Teams, Weird Business

This is an article from the Sept. 4, 1961 issue

12 A jinx is broken, but surprising Cincy stays on top
16 A jinxer is ready, as astonishing Detroit sticks close

18 The Girl Who Was Too Good
Anne Quast Decker won the Women's Amateur for the second time by getting ahead and staying there

20 Carry Back Comes Back
The Kentucky Derby winner comes out of sick bay to win at Atlantic City in typical come-from-behind fashion

22 Fitful Winds of Alcatraz
The Coast Guard rescues a quartet of sailors who choose not to go down with the sloop in San Francisco Bay

24 Birth of a Solvent Baby
Before they have even played a game, Minnesota's new football Vikings are an assured financial success

30 Strategy, Strokes and Style
Bernard Fuchs's color paintings and Billy Talbert's experienced eye show what to expect at Forest Hills

36 Double Play Ins and Outs
The masters of baseball's best maneuver use talent tactics and tricks to insure success

50 A Success in Spite of His Money
A strong competitive drive brought Sonny Whitney to the top in mining, movie making, polo and horse racing

The departments

8 Scorecard
42 Horse Racing
44 Fishing
46 Automobiles
61 Baseball's Week
62 For the Record
63 19th Hole
64 Pat on the Back

Acknowledgments on page 62

Cover painting by Bernard Fuchs

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Next week

The modern treasure hunter is a skilled and serious workman who may start out looking for pieces of eight but is happy in the end if he manages to come home with a rusty cannon ball.

Although binoculars have long been used by sailors and race-goers, seven pages of pictures show glasses are a boon for all sports spectators-shirt-sleeved or fashionably dressed.

The U.S. Amateur Champion, Deane Beman, who may well become a millionaire one day soon, is by far the most successful of a new breed of golfer—the businessman-amateur.