VAS YOU EFER?
Sirs:
Your Mr. Cave had better find one or crawl back to the woodwork (Everything Came Up Red Roses, Oct. 2). He may not be interested, but the story goes that on the night that the Reds clinched the pennant a fierce-eyed, shaggy-haired genie suddenly appeared on one of those "weird" slopes down in little old Crosley Field. As the genie scuffed his way to the top he was heard to say:

Baseball fans, come along with me For the Reds, we've a right to rave On lop a slope yes, but also a league Far better than down like a Cave.
ROBERT C. JACOBS
Cincinnati

Sirs:
I suspect that Ray Cave spent most of his time in Cincinnati, if he was there at all, visiting the Cincinnati chapter of the Los Angeles Dodgers fan club.
JON DE VOLL
Hamilton, Ohio

AS A SUBSCRIBER I RESENT ARTICLE BY WALTER BINGHAM (Arms and the Men for Cincy, Oct. 9) DEGRADING CINCINNATI AND ITS REDS.
DAVE HUMMEL
CINCINNATI

AS LONG-TERM SUBSCRIBER I SINCERELY RESENT UNFRIENDLY STORIES CONCERNING REDS AND UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI BASKETBALL CHAMPIONS.
OLIVER P. BARDES
CINCINNATI

WE WILL NEVER BUY ANOTHER COPY OF YOUR CRUMMY MAGAZINE.
J.B. GREEN
CINCINNATI

Sirs:
Cincinnati fans will be laughing—all the way to the ball park, and the Reds will be laughing, as they say, all the way to the bank.
E.F. RISCH
Cincinnati

DECENT FELLOW
Sirs:
Roger Maris is a decent, normal young man who happens to have a knack for hitting home runs and who has been incredibly mistreated by sportswriters and fans.

Thanks for giving him a break (Pursuit of No. 60: The Ordeal of Roger Maris, Oct. 2).
STAN MEALS
Waco, Texas

Sirs:
The Ordeal of Roger Maris (Oct. 2) was truly a great story!
DENNIS D. JOHNSON
Greenville, S. C.

Sirs:
Congratulations to Mr. Kahn for a great article. It changed my views upon Roger Maris completely.
FELICE OFRIL
Richmond, Calif.

DECENT BURIAL
Sirs:
If you would care to send us the file copy of your preseason prediction of the Cincinnati Reds in second division at the finish (Analysis of the Reds, April 10), we shall be glad to cremate it, bury it six feet deep and guarantee it shall not return and haunt your editor's office.
EDGINGTON FUNERAL HOME
Winchester, Ky.

GOLDEN SOUL
Sirs:
Artist Francis Golden did more than capture the boundless physical beauty of the uplands (October in the Uplands, Oct. 2); he exposed the very soul of the hunter. With bold brush strokes he translated into color the feelings toward nature that throb within the hunter: awe of the vast woodlands, respect for the changing sky, admiration toward his elusive quarry.
RICHARD G. GUSTAFSON
St. Paul, Minn.

Sirs:
I think now I have never seen anything more beautiful.
S/SGT. DONALD NOER, USMC
Barstow, Calif.

MOUTH OF CLAY
Sirs:
I thoroughly enjoyed Huston Horn's article on Cassius Marcellus Clay (Who Made Me—is Me!, Sept. 25). It gives the reader an excellent insight into the nature of real modesty. Now all the loudmouth has to do is prove he can fight.
BOB DOWEN
Grosse Pointe Woods, Mich.

•See page 25.—ED.

FOR THE RECORD
Sirs:
It is not sentiment that caused Frick to make his decision (SCORECARD, Oct. 2). Next year, with both leagues expanded, they will go back to 154 games. If it did stay at 162 games, then a new set of long-season records would start. People will probably think that Jim Brosnan's book, The Long Season, was written about '61.
LAWRENCE PRICE
Los Angeles

Sirs:
Babe Ruth's record is broken. Maris hit all of his 61 home runs in the last 154 games.
STEPHEN POTTER
Cambridge, Mass.

Sirs:
I now read that a home-town boy, Jake Wood, has broken a record for most strikeouts in a season. This he has done in 162 games. What is good for one record is good for another. I don't think it is fair that his record will have to stand as being for a whole season while Maris' record will go side by side with Ruth's as being for a different number of games.
FREDERICK E. WITHERELL
Elizabeth, N.J.

Sirs:
Stuart Keith's claim to the bird-watching record (SCORECARD, Sept. 25) brings up another interesting question on records: Since he set the record in 1956, a leap year, will it be marked with an asterisk if he saw some of the birds on February 29th?
DAVID HERMAN
Natick, Mass.

SOUTHERN EXPOSURE
Sirs:
I would like to refute your statement that Ole Miss is too big for the teams that they play (Rebel Yell for 1961, Oct. 2), and I would also like to protest the injustice done to the northern college teams.

America's best football is played by teams outside the southern sections of the U.S. Last year, Michigan, which finished far down in the Big Ten Conference, played Duke and slaughtered them 31-6. Duke merely counted this in their slim loss column (7-3) and went on to high national rankings, while Michigan went on to a very unranked mediocre season. Mississippi, generally ranked No. 3 in postseason polls, coasted to a 10-0-1 record last year, getting fat off the offerings of the likes of Chattanooga and Houston, teams which the Big Ten wouldn't schedule as breathers. In fact, for breathers, the Big Ten often schedules teams from the rough, tough South, such as Duke.

By all this, I don't mean to discredit such great southern players as Pros Phil King, Charlie Conerly or Bart Starr.
DAVE PEARLMAN
White Bear, Minn.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)