UNMASKED POWER
Sirs:
Tex Maule's article on line play was fantastic (Pro Football Report, Oct. 23). The diagrams and drawings were great, the descriptions were clear.
ALAN SAMALIN
The Bronx, N.Y.

Sirs:
No one would dispute the fact that Bobby Layne is "one of professional football's finest quarterbacks." You are mistaken, however, in asserting that he is also "its only maskless player": Jess Richardson of the Philadelphia Eagles shares that distinction.
BILL BUTLER
West Chester, Pa.

Sirs:
I was surprised not to see Paul Hornung's picture among those of your five stars.
LEE D. BUCH
Quincy, Ill.

STANDING PAT
Sirs:
Here is a picture of Debbie Lee, 14, recent winner of the Maccabiah Games 100-meter freestyle swim in 1:06.4. In case you've forgotten, Debbie was one of your very first PATS ON THE BACK (Dec. 6, 1954).
ART ROSENBAUM
San Francisco

CUP CAKES
Sirs:
Congratulations on William McHale's magnificent tennis article (A Cup that Got Away, Oct. 23).

Instead of belittling the U.S. team and its captain as you have sometimes done in the past, you stuck to the facts with wit, humor and common sense.
WILLIAM S. KELLOGG
La Jolla, Calif.

Sirs:
I hope that you will give us more of these positive stories, rather than the inaccurate, negative ones that we have been getting recently.
DAVID L. FREED
Captain, U.S. Davis Cup Team
Salt Lake City

THUNDER AND DANDER
Sirs:
My Nebraska dander is up. You named Ernie Davis "Back of the Week" (Oct. 23). I would be one of the first to admit the ability of Mr. Davis, but Ernie ran only 120 yards against Nebraska. Nebraska's Bill Thornton (you called him "the man with the unlikely name of Thunder Thornton") ran 133 yards. Davis carried for an average close to six yards per carry. Thornton's average was almost nine yards.
SANDY SCHRINER
Lincoln, Neb.

Sirs:
Nebraska's Halfback Thunder Thornton is not an All-America, did not break anyone's scoring record, does not play on a team such as Syracuse and did not score his 26th and 27th touchdowns, but he clearly outplayed Syracuse's Davis.
MICHAEL G. MACLEAN
Lincoln, Neb.

"MOO"
Sirs:
Your piece on the Michigan-Michigan State game (No 'Moos' for Michigan State, Oct. 23) omitted several pertinent facts. One is that the 1961 Michigan team has lost no less than seven varsity guards up to now. Further, a school fields a team of boys who presumably have passed its admission requirements. There are fine athletes on the MSU squad who originally wanted to go to Michigan but who couldn't make it academically. This situation gives MSU Coach Duffy Daugherty a real edge—and he improves his lot by luring transfers from Notre Dame (which he has termed his "farm club").

MSU's "loveliest rolling farmland" is in reality an exurban area whose population is several times that of "city-bound" Ann Arbor. Michigan certainly does have some "architectural eyesores"—but what mature college lacks such?

MSU played heads-up ball and won properly. But most Michigan alumni prefer the university's lofty academic rank to Silo Tech's "handsome modern campus" and four-deep football squads.

"Moo-oo-ooo!"
WHIT HILLYER
Evanston, Ill.

Sirs:
Your article is snide and incoherent. If your reporter didn't hear us moo at MSU at the end of the game, it's because he had his ears closed as well as his eyes.
RALPH HUMPHRISS
BOB COOPER
Ann Arbor, Mich.

Sirs:
It would appear that Alfred Wright either:

1) graduated from Michigan State, or

2) flunked out of Michigan, or

3) like many others, picked Michigan to win and became emotionally involved in the outcome of the game.
GERALD L. VANDER WALL, D.D.S.
Grand Rapids

Sirs:
Thank you for a fine article on a great game.
HARRY FINSTER
East Lansing, Mich.

PHOTODEBBIE LEE
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)