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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

Dec. 04, 1961
Dec. 04, 1961

Table of Contents
Dec. 4, 1961

Ski Schedule
Yesterday
Football's Best
Trim And Strong
Big Deals
Boxing
College Football
Hockey
Gene Tunney
  • By Frank Graham Jr.

    Gene Tunney is a magic name in sport, one that evokes an instant and recognizable picture to millions of people, even though it is 35 years since he upset Jack Dempsey and won the heavyweight title. No athlete ever went to more pains to establish a public picture of himself but, incongruously, no athlete ever succeeded in obscuring his own great skills so completely. The story of Tunney then (left, in 1926) and Tunney now is the story of a man who has been almost unbearably successful

Acknowledgments
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Pat On The Back

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

IN THE SMOG
Sirs:
The simple truth about Los Angeles sports (Apathy in Smogsville, Nov. 13) is that the well-known goose that laid the golden eggs has overexerted, hence the goose eggs at the box office. Too much of a good thing. There is an unemployment situation here (despite what the Department of Labor says), business is in the doldrums and the average fan feels that he can better enjoy a do-it-yourself sport, with less outlay of cash, than a spectator sport.

This is an article from the Dec. 4, 1961 issue

Besides all this, the modern Los Angeleno generally hails from out of state and consequently has very little civic pride. He's the man who still says he is "going home" when he leaves for a visit to his family in the East or Midwest. When the team from his home town comes to Los Angeles, then he may bestir himself and go to the game to cheer that team, not the LA team.
PAT TAYLOR
Los Angeles

Sirs:
Usually I read your magazine just before going to bed, because it puts me to sleep. But after reading Apathy in Smogsville I just couldn't go to sleep until I told you what a lousy article it was.

If Roger Williams calls UCLA's 1960 record (7-2-1) a losing one, then I hope the Bruins have more losing seasons. In the future please don't print anything that will keep me up at night.
JEFF LITOW
Beverly Hills, Calif.

Sirs:
Mr. Williams refers to a "ho-hum student attitude" at USC resulting in insufficient student attendance in our rooting section and causing us to cancel our traditional half-time card stunts. What he didn't know is that it has become our custom in the past few years to cancel the card stunts at one game per year to allow a collection to be taken in the stands for the support of Troy Camp, our student-sponsored summer camp for underprivileged children. Regarding attendance at the USC-Illinois game, our card section seats 3,200 students; 2,965 of the seats were filled.
HUGH HELM
Los Angeles

Sirs:
Can you tell me of any other city in the entire United States that can match our two major league baseball teams, two fine universities, two pro basketball teams, one pro football team, literally hundreds of high school and junior college teams which participate in sports, fine facilities for baseball (Chavez Ravine), football (Coliseum—100,000), basketball (Sports Arena—40,000), etc., etc.? If Los Angeles isn't the sports capital of the world, then would you please tell me what city is?
MICHAEL MATTHAY
Los Angeles

Sirs:
We resent being called Smogsville.
CHRIS KANNE
Los Angeles

NEW CUP
Sirs:
Thanks for keeping us tennis buffs informed on the pros (The Kramer Cup Runneth All Over the Court, Nov. 20). However, if, as you predict, the Kramer Cup will supplant the Davis Cup I for one would like to know what it looks like.
MARK DURYEA
New York City

•For a view of the pro cup which stands 42 cm. high and cost $4,000, see above.—ED.

ROSE-BOWL-COLORED
Sirs:
Your man Alfred Wright must have observed the Ohio State-Iowa game through Rose-(Bowl)-colored glasses (Two Big Decisions, Nov. 13). If Joe Sparma, or any other OSU quarterback, dared call a play on his own, Woody Hayes would give him 30 lashes and a revised "contract." At least 83,795 of us who were there know that Woody has sent in every play for the past two years.
E. WAYNE BALSER
Columbus, Ohio

Sirs:
We, the members of the Fergy Fan Club of Phillips Academy, cannot begin to express our gratitude for your recognition of Ohio State Fullback Bob Ferguson.

We have felt from the beginning of the year that Mr. Ferguson is the most awesome creature ever to slip into a gray-and-red OSU uniform—and your article, with the full-color action photograph accompanying it, more than sufficiently held up our belief.
GEORGE E. ANDREWS
JOHN COWDEN
Andover, Mass.

Sirs:
In the future please don't refer to the Woody Hayes offense as "three-yards-and-a-cloud-of-dust" (SCORECARD, NOV. 20).

As any Ohio schoolboy could tell you, that adds up to a fourth-and-one situation after three running plays. And on a fourth down with only one yard to go Woody always punts.
GLENN A. JORDAN
Granville, Ohio

QUICK RESULTS
Sirs:
After reading your article concerning isometric contraction (Get Strong Without Moving, Oct. 30), I decided to try this exercise. After just two weeks I find the results amazing. So far I have developed one rupture, one hernia, a dislocated elbow and a slipped disc. My chiropractor sends regards and wishes you to keep up the good work.
DON LINCYCOMB
Greenville, Texas

•You'd better keep an eye on that chiropractor. Meanwhile, for the proper—and painless—way to exercise isometrically, see page 34.—ED.

CAGEY
Sirs:
I have one question on your recent article, Don't Shoot Until I Open the Cage (Nov. 20).

If game-preserve shooting is called hunting, why even open the cage?
VIC POTVIN
Claremont, N.H.

FOR DEAR OLD...
Sirs:
Rutgers University started playing football in 1869 by defeating Princeton in the first intercollegiate football game ever played. However, later that same year the Princeton Tigers inflicted a defeat on the Scarlet Knights, and ever since then Rutgers has been hoping for an undefeated season. There have been several near-misses. In 1924 Rutgers won its first seven games only to bow to Bucknell in Philadelphia in the rain and mud in the season's finale. In 1958 Rutgers again won its first seven games but lost to the Quantico Marines 13-12, while star tailback Billy Austin sat on the sidelines with a broken arm (Austin later was named to the AP All-America team). Last season the Scarlet Knights won their first five games but ran into a fired-up Villanova team, which beat them by a disheartening 14-12 count.

This season (Rutgers' 93rd in intercollegiate football) the Scarlet Knights have again run off eight games in a row. The only obstacle between the team and our first undefeated year is Columbia. Last year Rutgers beat Columbia by a score of 43-2. Thus Columbia will be out to avenge that defeat as well as to topple Rutgers from the ranks of the unbeaten. Rutgers will be up for the game not only because of the undefeated angle but also because Rutgers Coach John Bateman used to play and coach at Columbia under Lou Little. This game should be a natural.
MELVYN H. MOTOLINSKY
Highland Park, N.J.

•It was; see FOOTBALL'S WEEK, page 65.—ED.

PHOTOTHE KRAMER CUP, PRO TENNIS' PRIZE