19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

December 25, 1961

SHAME OF WINNING
Sirs:
After reading Agony Instead of Roses (Dec. 11), I wonder if we could get the Ohio State faculty to read about the Silver Goalpost winners in the same issue (Silver Anniversary All-Americas, 1936-61)? Maybe they could call up a few of these gentlemen and ask them if there is anything shameful about winning. I fail to see how 30 or 40 football players, by playing good football, will in any way contaminate the other 16,000 OSU students.
HARRY T. BOOSO
South Pasadena, Calif.

Sirs:
If the Ohio State faculty would have their school known for academics rather than athletics, I suggest two goals: that for every national championship football team Coach Hayes produces, the faculty produce a Nobel Prizewinner; and for every All-America that Woody turns out, the faculty turn out a Rhodes scholar.
RICKEY ECKLER
Princeton, N.J.

Sirs:
Hooray for Ohio State's faculty men Roses, or rather rosemary, may be for remembrance, as Shakespeare says, but a little swotting in the classroom helps, too. I, for one, can't blame the profs for thinking there should be a limit to the football season.
JOHN HAYNES
Chicago

Sirs:
We did not call for Vanderbilt to get out of the Southeastern Conference (SCORECARD, Dec. 18). Rather we insisted that "...a farsighted analysis of what steps the university must take to retain its already jeopardized athletic tradition is what is needed." Getting out of the SEC might be a part of this program but certainly it was not the main intent of the editorial.

We are not yet completely convinced that it is impossible for Vanderbilt to produce a winning football team within the limits imposed by high academic requirements and a limited enrollment.
LAMAR ALEXANDER
Editor, Vanderbilt Hustler
Nashville

POE'S POST
Sirs:
After reading your "Milepost" on the death of Edgar Allan Poe (FOR THE RECORD, Dec. 11), I believe that you have not given Mr. Poe full credit. Although you mention that he was a onetime (1889-1890) Princeton University football great, you imply that his football career ended there. In 1891 Mr. Poe was the first "official" football coach at Navy (after 11 years of student coaches) and he posted a winning record of 5-2. Also worthy of note is the fact that he was the first Navy football coach to lose to Army (32-16) in the second game of that now "historic rivalry. This in itself is a distinction because Navy football coaches who lose to Army have been hard to find of late.
MIDSHIPMAN JAMES H. SPRUANCE
Annapolis, Md.

•SPORTS ILLUSTRATED is grateful to the midshipman relative (distant cousin) of a famed admiral for further information on the coaching great-nephew of a famed poet. The 20th century Edgar Allan Poe was one of six Poe brothers who played football for Princeton. The third brother, John, also served Navy as a coach and posted a 5-3 record for the season of 1896.—ED.

WABASH BLUES
Sirs:
Congratulations on your very fine Basketball Issue (Dec. 11). I would, however, like to offer one constructive thought. You virtually overlooked the 400-odd colleges that belong to the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics, a group that must number around 500,000 undergraduates. A good many of these colleges could lick a considerable number of the teams you covered.

Moreover, I'm sure I need not point out that among onetime NAIA basketball players who subsequently starred in the NBA are such well-known hoopsters as Belus Smawley of Appalachian State, Johnny Norlander and Vern Mikkelsen of Ham-line, George King of Morris Harvey and Joe Fulks, Murray State—to suggest but a few.
WILLIAM G. MOKRAY
Vice-president, Boston Celtics
Boston

Sirs:
All one needs to do to become a firm believer in Indiana basketball is to attend a tournament game.
CHARLES W. ELLIS
Greenville, Ill.

THE QUALITY OF MERCY
Sirs:
I was disappointed that you saw fit to ignore the Mercy Bowl game played in Los Angeles on Thanksgiving Day. With the hullabaloo going on all over the country on the various commercial bowl games, it would seem to me to have been very newsworthy to find a game being played by two fine teams for a cause of real charity: helping the survivors of the California Polytechnic team that was nearly obliterated in a plane crash last year. This was a game where even the players, coaches and ushers paid their way into the stadium.
ERWIN LEHMANN
Fresno, Calif.

Sirs:
Not only was the Mercy Bowl successful financially (proceeds exceeded $175,000), but Fresno State proved itself to be No. 1 in the nation among small college football teams by thoroughly trouncing Bowling Green 36-6.
JIM LOWE
CHUCK BUSH
Fresno, Calif.

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)