Search

A BREATHLESS VIEW FROM THE HOTTEST SPOT ON THE ICE

Jan. 15, 1962
Jan. 15, 1962

Table of Contents
Jan. 15, 1962

Table of Contents
Twice Two
Jolly Lark
  • A lusty chip off England's finest old block demonstrates the versatility and verve of his famous grandsire as he captains the Oxford ski team to victory in its annual race against Cambridge at Z√ºrs, Austria. Despite his skiing responsibilities, young Churchill, 21, an aspiring journalist, took time to boost the morale of both spectators (above) and teammates (following pages), and to write this account, the first article he has published outside his native country

Pro Football
Nature
Basketball
Yesterday
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over

A BREATHLESS VIEW FROM THE HOTTEST SPOT ON THE ICE

At times he is a mere spectator. Then, suddenly, the attack approaches and in a split second the man idling in front of the nets must respond. By affixing a camera inside the goal itself, Photographer John Zimmerman has here found a way to give all hockey fans a breathless view of the crackling menace and the need for instant, urgent response that make up a goalie's professional life. On this and the following pages the reader is invited to imagine himself armored in the manner of Boston's Don Head (below) and, while avoiding the menace, to share the excitement of the game's hottest vantage point

This is an article from the Jan. 15, 1962 issue Original Layout

"In the minor leagues," says the truculent Bruin goalie (right), who spent years of apprenticeship before graduating to the National Hockey League, "there were only a few good shooters. Here everybody's good. And they don't hang on to the puck. They let fly, so a goalie has less chance to get ready."

Montreal's Jacques Plante kneels to clear puck as a teammate swoops to the rescue

New York's Gump Worsley sprawls to glove a low drive by Montreal's Claude Provost

Toronto's split-legged Johnny Bower kicks away a goal-bound puck (behind stick handle)

FOUR PHOTOS