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A TIME OF HIGH PROMISE

March 05, 1962
March 05, 1962

Table of Contents
March 5, 1962

Boating
Time Of Promise
Yesterday
Payin' Hobby
Bridge
Motor Sports
Bowling
Basketball
Part II: The Ways Of Life At The Country Club
19th Hole: The Readers Take Over
Departments

A TIME OF HIGH PROMISE

Two whirlybirds in Los Angeles last week brought a hint of spring. Flying low over the swamped turf of Chavez Ravine, the Dodgers' new stadium, they helped dry the field with their propellers so that preparations might continue for the start of the baseball season just six weeks away. At the same time, winter sports—basketball, hockey and indoor track—were reaching the climax of their seasons. The big names were still Lucas, Chamberlain, Bathgate, Beatty, Snell and Gubner, but those February heroes were gradually giving way to Maris, Mays and Stengel, to talk of the Kentucky Derby, the Masters and a heavyweight title fight in June. The sun was getting warmer every day

This is an article from the March 5, 1962 issue

A LOT OF WIND IN A WATERLOGGED STADIUM
Walter O'Malley's $18.5 million stadium in Chavez Ravine was nearing completion when heavy rains hit the Los Angeles area. They fell for five days, and when they stopped the field was a quagmire. A shaken O'Malley surveyed the mess and stoutly declared that the field would be in shape for the Dodgers' opening game on April 10, a little more than a month off. O'Malley having spoken, efforts to dry out the field began at once, with the help of two helicopters borrowed from a local radio station. When the stadium is ready for business, whether on time or late, it will seat 56,000 people, with room for expansion to 85,000. There are no posts or columns, and by October, O'Malley hopes, it will be a fine place to watch the 1962 World Series.

A HORSE'S WORRISOME ANKLE
The day after his victory in the Everglades (left), Sir Gaylord, one of the nation's finest 3-year-olds, became lame from a small bone lesion with slight ligament damage on the inside joint of his right front ankle (above). It may have occurred during the race or in his stall later—no one was sure. Sir Gaylord definitely will miss this week's Flamingo Stakes, but Owner Christopher T. Chenery believes that the injury is only temporary and has not yet counted his horse out of the running in the May Kentucky Derby.

SOME SKIERS' HAPPY ROOTERS
A group of happy young collegians whoop it up in a snowstorm during one of the races at the annual Middlebury College Winter Carnival. The carnival consists of ski races, basketball and hockey, and involves such schools as Dartmouth, Harvard, MIT and Skidmore, as well as Middlebury. But the icing on the cake is the partying and dancing that last till the 2 a.m. curfew. This year the carnival was won by Dartmouth, Middlebury's biggest rival. Other than that, the weekend was a complete success.

A CHAMP'S CHAMPION BROTHER
Ray Patterson, the 19-year-old brother of World Heavyweight Champion Floyd, couldn't find a knockout punch, but he put together enough long rights and lefts to win a three-round decision over Thomas Watkins (left) in the finals of the New York Golden Gloves heavyweight division. For young Patterson, who plans to turn professional in May, the future seemed definite. For Floyd it was not. While the champion muttered promises of an imminent signing for his next title defense, against the controversial Sonny Liston, his elusive manager, Cus D'Amato, dropped completely out of sight. D'Amato has said that he opposes the Liston fight.

TOURNAMENT-BOUND IN TEXAS
Jubilantly making the V sign, student fans at Southern Methodist join in a traditional yell as the SMU basketball team defeats Texas Christian 96-86 and, like twoscore other colleges around the U.S., moves closer to a berth in a postseason tournament. The Mustangs, who are now tied with Texas Tech for the Southwest Conference lead, have the easier schedule and are a distinct favorite for the title. Should SMU win, it probably will join Ohio State, Kentucky, Cincinnati, and UCLA in the national championships. Against them, SMU will need all the yells it can get.

SIX PHOTOS