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19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

March 19, 1962
March 19, 1962

Table of Contents
March 19, 1962

Point Of Fact
  • An NCAA basketball tournament quiz to excite the memory and increase the knowledge of fans and armchair experts

The Reds Is Dead
The Hottest Spring
Boating
  • On her first day out of the yard, the Australian challenger looked sleek and promising, but Designer Alan Payne was making no predictions

Hockey
Basketball

19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

FINANCIAL FISH
Sirs:
As a member of the steelhead sport-fishing clan of the Pacific Northwest, I want to thank you for bringing the sportsman-Indian-steelhead fishing controversy into national focus where it belongs (SCORECARD, Feb. 26).

This is an article from the March 19, 1962 issue Original Layout

In legally black-marketing steelhead under his old treaties, the Indian is being used by commercial interests to "pad up" their self-exterminated salmon fishing business. He is certainly not catching "natural fish," as these steelhead are put into the stream by sportsmen's dollars. Nor is he using the fish for any reason whatsoever except a financial one.
CARL M. BLACKSTOCK
Seattle

RAILBIRD
Sirs:
There's that old pigeon again (First by a Beak, Feb. 26). Or didn't you know your sister publication LIFE showed him or his sire winning at the Fair Grounds [see below] about 11 years ago? What's with these New Orleans railbirds? Are they refugees from Antoine's or Arnaud's?
J. K. BAILEY
Wilmington

•Antoine's famed 122-year-old restaurant offers a dish called Pigeonnaux Royaux Sauce Paradis on its menu, but says Owner Roy Alciatore: "The birds we serve are so young they can't even fly, much less hang around a racetrack."—ED.

WALK-OFF
Sirs:
Although nothing can excuse a fan's clobbering the nose of an opposing player (SCORECARD, Mar. 5), only against a team coached by Al McGuire could this have happened at Jacksonville University.

The events in Jacksonville precipitating McGuire's walk-off are related to the Jacksonville-Belmont Abbey game of last season in which two Abbey bench warmers were substituted late in a close game to "guard" the then leading scorer in Florida, Center Jim Kirkland. A fight ensued within seconds, leaving the referees no alternative but to sideline the players involved. J.U., minus its leading scorer, lost by one point.

This year the same routine was tried, only earlier and with even bigger quarry in view: Roger Strickland, leading scorer nationally in both the NAIA and NCAA small-college division. This time, however, it did not work. McGuire, seeing the game was about to be lost (Abbey had just lost an 11-point lead and control of the ball), did a brilliant about-face. After triggering a near riot, McGuire walked off the basketball court, thus making himself and his fellow crusaders martyrs to the cause of justice and decency on the hardwood.
MALCOLM BAROWAY
Jacksonville

Sirs:
You failed to mention that the reason the J.U. fans went so wild was that they saw the nation's small-college scoring leader, Roger Strickland, tackled from behind even though he wasn't involved in the fight which was then going on.
JACK CARITHERS
Jacksonville

Sirs:
Jacksonville University would have won anyway! It was Coach McGuire's own fault that the game turned out the way it did.
WALTER L. FARMER JR.
Jacksonville

YOUTH SWINGS ETERNAL
Sirs:
Mickey Wright's article on the golf swing (Anyone Can Hit a Long Ball, Feb. 19) is absolutely the best I have ever seen since I began playing in 1916.

In the first game I played trying to use the swing she explained and illustrated, most of my drives were materially longer and still right down the middle.

Due to my age, which reached 82 on January 28th, my drives have been getting shorter of late years. Just as soon as I get this new swing grooved I expect to be able to shoot my age or lower regularly.

As I now play nearly every weekday I expect to get more pleasure from this improved swing than anything that can happen to me.

On our 484-yard 10th hole at the De Bell course on Monday the 26th the ball was 20 yards from the green on my second shot!

Give my most hearty thanks to Mickey.
WARWICK RAY
Burbank, Calif.

CASE IN POINT
Sirs:
You have had powerful covers before, but never anything with the impact of "Casey of the Mets" (March 5). This living portrait of the "grand old man" is not only real and gripping, but somehow catches the strength and courage of all humanity.
MARTIN J. WYAND
Champaign, Ill.

PHOTO