19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

March 26, 1962

UP CINCY
Sirs:
Cincy isn't worried (The Bucks for the Title, March 12; The Reds Is Dead, March19). You ran us down last year, too.
CECIL OSBORN JR.
Cincinnati

Sirs:
A writer—Ray Cave is the name,
Whose promise for Cincy is shame,
Is pressing his luck
Twice picking the Bucks,
Or perhaps he's more hopeful than sane.

The Bearcats'defeat last year of "the best college basketball team of all time," toquote Mr. Cave, has hardly influenced his powers of prognostication. Hisanalysis of this year's tournament was simplified by "safe" and"logical" choices, but ignored two aphorisms—namely, that the"best" team is not forever victorious, and that the champion is usuallybacked until he loses.
ROGER O. MOORE
Washington, D.C.

Sirs:
Some people never learn.
ROBIN MEYER
Cincinnati

Sirs:
The Bearcats of Cincinnati will speak for themselves with a victory.
JOHN R. MITCHELL
Cincinnati

Sirs:
So what else is new?
GARY NUHN
Blanchester, Ohio

ON BENDED KNEE
Sirs:
My torn cartilage and torn ligament and scarred knees would like to thankProfessor Klein for attempting to save the knees of America (The Knee Is Notfor Bending, March 12).
BILLY LUDEL
Fresh Meadows, N.Y.

Sirs:
Duck waddle as an exercise may be disastrous to a footballer's knee, but as atest it is often of diagnostic value.

If you can do aneasy, comfortable duck waddle, be assured your medial knee cartilages are ingood condition.
HAROLD M. CHILDRESS, M.D.
Jamestown, N.Y.

Sirs:
I wish to challenge Professor Klein with my knees. I am a strict advocate ofthe deep knee bend, even with heavy weights. I have lived on squats for aboutthree years, and have yet to suffer any knee ailments. I have never worn anykind of knee bandage, nor ever been slowed by a strained knee.
JOHNNY MEANS
South Charleston, W. Va.

REASONEDREBUTTAL
Sirs:
Your article commending the "thoughtful" case for the AAU presented byMr. John B. Kelly (SCORECARD, March 12) deserves an answer, if only to presentto your readers a more complete picture of the controversy.

You say that"the conflict...has degenerated from reasoned argument tovituperation." It should have been pointed out that at no time has the NCAA(or the National Collegiate Track Coaches Association) indulged inpersonalities or vituperation. The talk about "power grab" and"disgruntled coaches" has come only from the AAU.

One point made byMr. Kelly in his "reasoned argument" is that "the AAU can operateon less than $175,000 a year, but the many federations that would strip it ofpower probably would need more than $75,000 each." I'm afraid that Mr.Kelly is thinking of the well-paid "amateurs" in the AAU and not of the"mercenary" professional coaches who give freely of their time andeffort without any compensation whatsoever.

Here is what theTrack Coaches Association accomplishes on a budget of about $4,000 per year: 1)We send to each of our 900 members a membership card and a de-cal for his car.2) Each member receives a year's subscription to Track and Field News. 3) Weconduct two major clinics each year where new ideas and techniques arediscussed. We usually have from 200 to 500 coaches in attendance at theseclinics. 4) Each member receives a bound copy of the proceedings of theseclinics, with illustrated articles on techniques, training methods andschedules, etc. 5) Members receive advance notices of clinics and meetings andperiodic communications to keep them in touch with the work of the association.6) We issue the official All-America certificates to athletes and certificatesof commendation to newspapermen and others who have helped to promote oursport.

All this weaccomplish on something less than $4,000 per year; $75,000 indeed, Mr.Kelly.
PHIL DIAMOND
Secretary-Treasurer NCTCA
Ann Arbor, Mich.

POISONED IVY
Sirs:
After reading your letters to the editor entitled "Hyman's Week" (19thHOLE, March 12), we at Dartmouth feel obliged to ask equal time. After all,we've lost only to St. John's, La Salle, Manhattan, Loyola and nine otherteams, twice to five of them. Our Ivy League record of 3-11 places us among thetop seven teams in the league, and against La Salle in Madison Square Garden weactually were leading at one point, only to blow the game in the final seconds,87-60.
PAUL S. FEINBERG
Hanover, N.H.

ROADSTERS
Sirs:
Dolly Connelly has pointed out many aspects of life on the Alaska Highway thatwere as true 20 years ago as they are today (Challenge of the Adventure Road,March 12). I was disappointed, however, that she made no mention of the PeaceRiver, which is the main point of interest between Dawson Creek and FortNelson.

It was exactly 20years ago that the 74th Engineer Light Ponton Company, of which I was a member,left Fort Riley, Kansas for service on the Adventure Road. We arrived in DawsonCreek on March 14, one day after the first unit arrived for duty in thesouthern sector of the highway. Our convoys initially crossed the Peace onplanks laid on the ice and later on a stern-wheel ferry. The ferry carried allsupplies across the Peace River destined for points north during the navigablemonths until the bridge shown in the enclosed snapshot (see page 75) was putinto operation.
GEORGE S. TERRY JR.
Brockport, N.Y.

Sirs:
This was an Adventure Road for me, too. During the summer of 1946 I set out ona hitchhiking trip that took me from Hartford, Conn, to Niagara Falls, acrossupper Ontario, through Winnipeg, through Yellowstone, Grand Teton, Glacier,Waterton Lakes and Banff national parks.

At Edmonton,Alberta I was quickly shown out of the Canadian government office when I askedpermission to travel the Road. Apparently only people who were planning tosettle in Alaska were being allowed to travel over this route. And, too, thesepeople were required to carry all sorts of emergency equipment. When anAmerican Army sergeant on an Edmonton street told me there wasn't one chance in10 million of getting through, my mind was made up.

I left DawsonCreek with two small cans of hash, a can of stew, a half-pound of cheese and afew round disks of Swedish hard bread. By considerable good luck I wasforewarned before reaching each of the six police checkpoints, whereupon I leftmy ride, shouldered my pack and took to the woods and circled the building. Asit was usually evening by that time, I made my simple camp and slept. The nextday it might be 1 p.m. before the first car, going either way, appeared. I wasgratified that everyone stopped to see if everything was all right with me.Traffic on the Alaska Highway was about five to 10 cars per 24-hour period.

I rememberTrapper Knute Hillgren in northernmost British Columbia and I remember Mrs.McIntosh at her trading post at Mile 1010. And I remember most of all theisolation. There were stretches of that magnificent road where one traveled for200 miles between habitation of any kind.
PAUL J. BUTLER
Clearwater, Fla.

NO PERCENTAGE
Sirs:
In your analysis of the Liston-Patterson fight negotiations you stated that Istand to receive 10% of Liston's purse (SCORECARD, March 12). This is untrue. Iam a lawyer only. I will present a fee for my services, but that is all.
MORTON WITKIN
Philadelphia

•SPORTSILLUSTRATED regrets the error and the awkward position in which it placed Mr.Witkin.—ED.

O'MALLEY'SANGELS
Sirs:
In your two-page spread showing two helicopters hovering over the unfinishedplaying surface of Mr. O'Malley's new baseball park in Chavez Ravine (Time ofHigh Promise, March 5), you missed a point of interest to many thousands ofrecently won Los Angeles baseball fans. The helicopters pictured were furnishedby Los Angeles Angels' Owners Gene Autry and Bob Reynolds!
HARRY J. HUTCHENS
North Hollywood, Calif.

15 TO GO
Sirs:
In SCORECARD (Feb. 26) you advocated strong laws against bribery and acceptanceof a bribe in athletic contests. You listed South Carolina as one of 16 stateshaving no such law.

On March 8, 1962the Governor of South Carolina signed into law an act (H. 2049) to remedy thebribery situation in South Carolina. I certainly hope the other 15 statesfollow suit soon.
G. F. BOWIE
Columbia, S.C.

POACHED ORFRIED?
Sirs:
Say now, that little story about Poacher Billy Moore was really keen (Payin'Hobby, March 5)! Wow! He sure is putting something over on that old Britishsquire and the cops, isn't he? How about a story on John Dillinger and how hefooled those old American bankers and cops?
MAX WORREL MCCORD JR.
Sewanee, Tenn.

PHOTOPONTOON BRIDGE ON PEACE RIVER

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)