GAMBLING GEYSERS
Sirs:
That fellow Robert Boyle comes on strong and friendly as a new rooster in a hen house (The Hottest Spring, March 19). His descriptions of fun-spangled Hot Springs—its sporty habitués and sporting activities, its solid citizens and Runyonesque characters—present a delightfully accurate picture of a thoroughly charming town.

One encounters lots of otherwise nice folks who have the mule-lipped opinion that excitement in Arkansas is limited to throwing rocks at snakes and that nocturnal activity consists of sitting around by lantern light and discussing the price of soybeans. We're grateful for your contributions to their education.
LEWIS M. TEETER
Pine Bluff, Ark.

Sirs:
You state that the old order in Hot Springs was overthrown by the G.I.s under my leadership, that during my tenure as district attorney gambling was closed but subsequent to my election as governor illegal gambling returned.

I enforced the law while I was prosecuting attorney. Subsequent to my election as governor, as the chief law enforcement officer of the state, I continued to honor my oath of office.

On February 28, 1952 the state police, under Captain Ben Kent, raided the Southern Club and the Pines, confiscating $75,000 worth of gambling equipment.

Open, illegal gambling was not resumed in Arkansas until after I went out of the governor's office in January 1953.
SIDNEY S. MCMATH
Little Rock, Ark.

•Governor McMath did indeed put a stop to the gambling—on the day of the raid.—ED.

Sirs:
A striking example that gambling can be conducted cleanly by local citizens as a tourist attraction.

Some years ago it used to be this way in our wonderful old city of New Orleans. The tourists used to flock here for something besides Oysters Rockefeller and the French Quarter. Then the syndicate came, followed by a crime commission, and this spoiled everything.

Except for Mardi Gras and Sugar Bowl time, we get the Greyhound bus and $10 excursion crowd. The trouble with reformers is they don't know when to stop reforming. Next we'll probably have closed movies, closed taverns and no golf on Sunday.
JUD RAYMOND
New Orleans

ALIVE, ALIVE-O
Sirs:
The Reds Is Dead (March 19)—just as they were last year, when you said they would end up in sixth place.

I must agree that Cincinnati's Reds arc having their troubles, but they are far from dead. They just started to live.
BARRY BLOCK
Dayton

Sirs:
Better the National League with Dead Reds than the American League with nine teams that never even lived!
MRS. JACK NUTTER
Newark, Ohio

Sirs:
Three cheers for Walter Bingham. The Reds is dead.
KEN CONRAD
East Peoria, Ill.

Sirs:
Your candid snapshot of Gene Freese sliding into second, with unfortunate results thereof, was simply fantastic!

I experienced shooting pains in my left ankle (which I broke 12 years ago) for the rest of the day.
LEIGH BACKSTROM
Providence

COUSY CURE
Sirs:
I agree with Bob Cousy about the defensive game (Basketball—or Vaudeville? March 19). More stress has got to be put on it. I think one way might be the elimination of the 24-second rule.
JOEL ALDERMAN
Kent, Ohio

Sirs:
I am still much in favor of raising the baskets to 12 feet. As Bob says, the 7-footer will still be 12 inches closer than the 6-footer. But the tall man, though closer, would still not be at the basket nor above the basket. He would be under it.

With all the discussion pro and con about raising the baskets, it's odd how little experimentation has actually been arranged to observe the practical advantages of higher goals.
W. ROSS BOOKER
Kansas City, Mo.

Sirs:
How about an actual experiment, televised—a SPORTS ILLUSTRATED promotion—between altitude-divided teams of all-star pros?
ALAN BAXTER
Hollywood

Sirs:
The solution here is clear. Play the shorter schedule, but don't cut the players' salaries for the year involved. If profits are less, have the players bound to take a proportionate cut in their salaries for the next year.
RICHARD F. TEETSEL
Buffalo

Sirs:
I hope the NBA considers Bob's proposals, because professional basketball is like the daily news. It's there every night, and if I miss it one day I know I can see it another. No single game stands out.
W. P. PECKHAM
Watsonville, Calif.

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