19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

May 13, 1962

FOR THE BIRDS
Sirs:
I like and feed birds, but I thought that Mr. Tinsley's piece (Here Come Our Feathered Enemies!, April 30) was cute. Of course, it doesn't mean anything.
BILL BENNETT
Highland Park, Ill.

Sirs:
Raymond Tinsley is an out-and-out idiot. Five minutes after he had killed every bird in the world he would be so swarming with insects that he would hardly be able to write his second article entitled Here Comes Our Six-legged Enemies!

One more stupid, one-sided article like this and I'll cancel my subscription.
PETER B. LAURIE
Dalton, Pa.

Sirs:
Raymond Tinsley's emotional article leaves me cold. So some birds do occasionally transmit disease, but has he ever made a survey of the maladies that he might conceivably catch from his fellow humans? Perhaps we should accommodate him in a sterile, stainless-steel abode, impervious to the ravages of the bacteria that inhabit most of nature's domain. For myself, I prefer to accept the risk of hearing the chirping of the sparrow, and glimpsing the superb color and pure beauty of so many of the creatures that have an inalienable right to share this world of ours.
MERVYN GAYLARD
Fulton, N.Y.

Sirs:
A carrier pigeon dropped this manuscript on my desk the other day. I thought your bird editor might like to have it.

On a tree by a willow, a little torn tit
Sang "Tinsley, o Tinsley, o Tinsley!"
So I said to him, "Dickey Bird, why do you sit
Singing, 'Tinsley, o Tinsley, o Tinsley'?
Are you angry at Raymond? Are you in a pet?"
With a chirp only faintly suffused with regret
He replied, "I am waiting to fly at a jet
Bearing Tinsley, o Tinsley, o Tinsley."
PETER SANDERSON
Woodmere, N.Y.

Sirs:
Something your "brave" bird fighter omits in his third-class article is the brave war record of "Cher Ami," the pigeon that caused General Pershing to carry that brave soldier in feathers to the ship in World War I. Not to mention a dozen other birds that won decorations for their bravery under fire, coming in with spattered blood and broken legs with their messages dangling to a tendon. Your great Paper Warrior Tinsley makes real men want to throw up.
RALPH HAINES
Portland, Ore.

FOR RAY
Sirs:
Three cheers for putting into print what I've long been advocating. Birds eat our cherries, have bombing practice with my clean wash on the clothesline, and are just plain "dirty birds." Would that they concentrate their dirty work around the homes of the bird lovers!
MARY L. LINK
Kenosha, Wis.

Sirs:
As a longtime ornithphobe I congratulate Raymond Tinsley on his April article exposing some of the more notorious of our feathered fiends. While it cannot be denied that some nonedible birds are useful, most of these reptilian anachronisms are vandals, noisemakers, spreaders of filth and carriers of disease.

Fortunately we are no longer plagued by the passenger pigeon, and when the starling, English sparrow, city pigeon, sea gull, swallow and robin have gone their way, civilization and sanitation will have taken a long step forward.
MIKE MATROSS
Gardiner, Mont.

FOR THE BOYS
Sirs:
SPORTS ILLUSTRATED outdid itself in that priceless article on boys' baseball books {A Sneering Laugh with the Bases Loaded, April 23). Those were the "good old days" for sure. My project for today is to track down Ralph Henry Barbour's Weatherby's Inning and reread it for old time's sake. Thanks for the memories.
ELEANOR GUSTAFSON
Hampton, Va.

Sirs:
Robert Cantwell was talking to our generation.
HAL EVANS
Larned, Kans.

Sirs:
I was reminded of Albert Stearns's fascinating story, Chris and the Wonderful Lamp, in the March 1895 number of St. Nicholas. Chris, the home-team pitcher, finding himself in peril of being knocked out of the box, begs time to go to the clubhouse for his "medicine," where, rubbing an old lamp a la Aladdin, he summons the genie, who as Chris's double takes his place on the mound. Needless to say, the genie strikes out the opposing side and, for good measure, goes on to win the game with a bases-loaded home run.

Doubtless many a modern pitcher has wished that he might summon a doubling genie. Alas that such stories today are found only on secondhand bookshelves.
LYMAN G. RICHARDS, M.D.
Cambridge, Mass.

Sirs:
You overlooked an interesting, yet average book: Home Run King; or How Pep Pindar Won His Title, by Babe Ruth. It was published by the A. L. Burt Company in 1920. It fits pretty well into the stereotype of the books you mentioned, and from it you can see that the Babe was a heck of a lot more ballplayer than author.
CHARLES SANDMEL
Cincinnati

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)