A stout Florida sea breeze may sharpen the appetite and stiffen the spine, but bridge players who migrate to Miami year after year have found that it also blows away their instinctive sense of caution. Miami bridge becomes a kind of commuter bridge on the beach, with bidding of the same flamboyant type that is heard during those hurried last hands before the 6:02 pulls into Darien.

This peculiarity of Miami bridge has existed for years. Witness, for example, the bidding of Bill Dunlop, one of the first of the traveling Northerners to bring south this brash style of play. Floridians still talk about this dramatic deal, one of many which earned for Bill the apt nickname of Tiger.

The story is in the bidding. But some understanding of Tiger's character is also needed. Bill was inevitably involved in a surfside bridge game every afternoon. On this occasion he found himself with a part score of 90—a rarity in itself in Miami bridge circles. Since one heart was enough for game, Tiger, sitting West, entered the auction with unprecedented—and questionable—conservatism.

Neither North nor East disturbed that bid, but South, with no defense against what was now an opposing game contract, decided to compete with a bid of one spade. Perhaps he should have deferred mention of his four-card suit until he had rebid clubs, but I must admit that it would have required some clairvoyance for South to have made no second bid at all. Against Tiger, however, that would have been by far the best course.

The next utterance, in a tone just as mild as his one-heart bid, was Tiger's "six diamonds." Now, deeply regretting that he had stirred up the animals, South decided to take his beating manfully and sacrifice at seven clubs. West then further manifested his ferocity by a rare forcing pass. By refusing to double after his strong bids, he absolutely obligated partner to take direct action.

Some idea of the credit accorded Tiger's deadly style may be gleaned from the fact that Bill Root, a conservative citizen, did not hesitate to accept the unspoken suggestion, bidding the grand slam. North, too, showed implicit faith in Tiger by bidding seven spades as a sacrifice.

North had not misjudged. Seven diamonds would have been cold. Winning the bid was a Pyrrhic victory, however, for the cost was 1,100 points.

South trumped the second heart and led a high spade. West ducked and won the spade continuation with the ace; then he forced South to ruff a third heart with his last trump. Now the defenders won three diamond tricks. Eventually, dummy was able to trump a red card with the spade 10, draw East's last trump with the jack and win a club finesse for a total of seven tricks.

EXTRA TRICK
When you have bid very strongly, the next available strong bid may be a forcing pass. Such a pass guarantees control. With a quick loser in clubs or spades, West would be obliged to double the opponents.

ILLUSTRATION

Neither side vulnerable East-West 90 part score South dealer

NORTH

[Jack of Spades]
[10 of Spades]
[8 of Spades]
[3 of Spades]
[8 of Hearts]
[7 of Hearts]
[4 of Hearts]
[6 of Clubs]
[5 of Clubs]
[3 of Clubs]
[9 of Diamonds]
[5 of Diamonds]
[2 of Diamonds]

WEST

[Ace of Hearts]
[King of Hearts]
[Queen of Hearts]
[Jack of Hearts]
[10 of Hearts]
[3 of Hearts]
[Ace of Spades]
[2 of Spades]
[Ace of Diamonds]
[Queen of Diamonds]
[Jack of Diamonds]
[10 of Diamonds]
[7 of Diamonds]

SOUTH

[King of Spades]
[Queen of Spades]
[7 of Spades]
[4 of Spades]
[5 of Hearts]
[Ace of Clubs]
[Queen of Clubs]
[10 of Clubs]
[9 of Clubs]
[8 of Clubs]
[7 of Clubs]
[4 of Clubs]
[8 of Diamonds]

EAST

[9 of Spades]
[6 of Spades]
[5 of Spades]
[9 of Hearts]
[6 of Hearts]
[2 of Hearts]
[King of Clubs]
[Jack of Clubs]
[2 of Clubs]
[King of Diamonds]
[6 of Diamonds]
[4 of Diamonds]
[3 of Diamonds]

SOUTH

1 [Club]
1 [Spade]
7 [Club]
PASS
PASS

WEST
(Tiger)

1 [Heart]
6 [Diamond]
PASS(!)
PASS
PASS

NORTH

PASS
PASS
PASS
7 [Spade]
PASS

EAST
(W. Root)

PASS
PASS
7 [Diamond]
DBL.

Opening lead: king of hearts

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)