19TH HOLE: THE READERS TAKE OVER

June 17, 1962

PRO LUCAS
Sirs:
If the majority of people are as snide, cynical and sarcastic as those who wrote in about Jerry Lucas and his decision to turn pro (19TH HOLE, June 4), he is wasting—on a lot of undeserving clods—the finest combination of character, intelligence and skill to come along in sports for some time.
DALE DONOVAN
Willoughby, Ohio

Sirs:
The comments concerning the article by Jerry Lucas (Why I Am Turning Pro, May 21) are the most infuriating and disgusting evidences of money-mad Americans I've read for a long time. Greed is the main reason for our world situation today, and it's really sad to think that some of our fellow Americans can misinterpret such a fine all-American decision as Jerry Lucas has made.

This was an excellent article and decision. My hat is off to Jerry Lucas and all the rest of the all-American citizens like him who put principles and spiritual values first and look beyond the temptation of a dollar.
MARJORIE L. PRICE
Columbus, Ohio

Sirs:
I sure can't see why Lucas deserves the criticism he is getting. For a man who has represented his country with distinction twice in Europe, both on and off the court, it sure doesn't make sense to me.

If Jerry never makes a point for the Pipers, he will always be tops with me.
ELWOOD HANTZ
Alliance, Ohio

GIANT KILLER
Sirs:
I think your Walter Bingham is crazy, like in the head. Who does he think he is to say the San Francisco Giants will fail again (The Giants. Boom and Bust, June 4)? He compares this year's team to the team of 1959. This is a poor comparison because the '59 Giants were plagued with gaping holes at key positions and a weak pitching staff. The '62 version of the Giants is a solid bunch of performers who work well as a team. Cepeda, Mays, Alou & Co, in this man's opinion, will walk away with the NL pennant and meet either the Twins or the Yankees in October.
DICK ERICKSON
Mound, Minn.

Sirs:
Let Mr. Bingham not waste his sympathy on us poor long-suffering San Franciscans, what with our wallowing team and "other assorted ills" of Candlestick Park. Going to the ball game is still a matter of choice and, since 1958, park and all, the Giants have provided us with a good brand of baseball, which we here appreciate. If I were paranoid, I would think that your magazine has it "in" for our city, what with the recent piece of fiction "debunking" the legend of SF and now this, but, as it is, only a small percentage of people here know that SPORTS ILLUSTRATED even exists, so that in truth your articles have the effect of a fly on a dinosaur.
ARTHUR CARFAGNI JR., M.D.
San Francisco

Sirs:
Huh! While the Dodgers lost two to the Phils, the Giants took three straight from New York. We'll see who's laughing when the Giants win the pennant and then beat the Yankees four straight in the Series.
PETER APPLEBOM
Great Neck, N.Y.

Sirs:
Congratulations to Walter Bingham for an unbiased report. We fans in the Bay Area have come to accept the fact that Memorial Day is the beginning of the end for Dark's Bombers. Our only hope is that more articles like this will shook the Giants just enough to bring us the pennant that we have patiently waited for and richly deserve.
KENT ANDERSON
San Jose, Calif.

ON THE SPEY
Sirs:
May I say how much I appreciated your article on Strathspey (River of Whisky and Salmon, June 4). Having recently visited this area, I can fully endorse all you have said about it.

One particular place I would like to mention, however, is the Duke of Gordon Hotel in Kingussie. The new owner, Bill Paterson, a former International soccer star (who, incidentally, played for the Boston Athletic Club in the '20s), has a really fine place there.
F. D. HUMESTON
Los Angeles

TALBERT'S ANGLES
Sirs:
The article by William F. Talbert (The Strategies of Singles, June 4) was very well illustrated. I have admired Talbert's playing for a number of years. However, I think his article lacks one thing—simplification.

Ten years ago when I was coaching the Howard University tennis team I attempted to advance the same ideas in my theory on how to win in singles—the main purpose being to reduce the angles of your opponent's shots and increase those of your own. This would not only put you in a better position for a return shot but also put your opponent in a poor position when attempting a return.
MAURICE JACKSON
Washington

RUFF CHANCE
Sirs:
Although Charles Goren has won his Ph.D. in bridge many times over, we feel that he and his partner passed opportunity by with this hand, shown in Catching the Right Cue (May 28).

Both sides vulnerable North dealer

NORTH

[8 of Spades]
[Ace of Hearts]
[7 of Hearts]
[3 of Hearts]
[King of Clubs]
[Queen of Clubs]
[Jack of Clubs]
[10 of Clubs]
[8 of Clubs]
[6 of Clubs]
[King of Diamonds]
[6 of Diamonds]
[5 of Diamonds]

WEST

[Jack of Spades]
[10 of Spades]
[7 of Spades]
[6 of Spades]
[2 of Spades]
[King of Hearts]
[Queen of Hearts]
[Jack of Hearts]
[4 of Hearts]
[9 of Clubs]
[5 of Clubs]
[10 of Diamonds]
[9 of Diamonds]

SOUTH

[3 of Spades]
[9 of Hearts]
[8 of Hearts]
[6 of Hearts]
[5 of Hearts]
[2 of Hearts]
[Ace of Clubs]
[Ace of Diamonds]
[Jack of Diamonds]
[7 of Diamonds]
[4 of Diamonds]
[3 of Diamonds]
[2 of Diamonds]

EAST

[Ace of Spades]
[King of Spades]
[Queen of Spades]
[9 of Spades]
[5 of Spades]
[4 of Spades]
[10 of Hearts]
[7 of Clubs]
[4 of Clubs]
[3 of Clubs]
[2 of Clubs]
[Queen of Diamonds]
[8 of Diamonds]

NORTH

1 [Club]
4 [Heart]
PASS

EAST

2 [Spade]
4 [Spade]

SOUTH

3 [Heart]
5 [Diamond]

WEST

3 [Spade]
PASS

A more logical bidding sequence that arrives at slam is:

NORTH

1 [Club]
4 [Diamond]
5 [Heart]
PASS

EAST

2 [Spade]
4 [Spade]
PASS
PASS

SOUTH

3 [Diamond]
5 [Club]
6 [Diamond]

WEST

3 [Spade]
PASS
PASS

The key to this sequence is South's five-club bid, showing first-round control in the club suit. North now bids five hearts to show first-round heart control and to insure a good chance of making six diamonds. At this point seven diamonds may also be a possibility, since South may have first-round control of spades and enough material in the minor suits to produce 13 tricks. We feel that in a disciplined partnership such cue-bidding sequences should be virtually a standard affair; otherwise slams go out the window for lack of precise communication.

The success of this contract depends essentially on the lay of the diamond suit. If the distribution of the outstanding diamonds is either 2-2 (probability .40696) or 3-1 with singleton queen (probability .12435) the total probability is .53131. This means declarer will fulfill his contract more than 50% of the time with 12 out of the following 13 tricks: six clubs, six diamonds, one heart. If spades aren't led, declarer can take all 13 tricks. Notice that the partnership has primary controls in hearts, diamonds and clubs and second-round control in the spade suit.
STORMY HORN
SPOOK HYDER
Boulder, Colo.

•As Dr. Goren sees it, while pure mathematics can easily be applied to a cold and open deck, the player at the table must rely mainly on what he hears. In this case the scientific formula discounts two important possibilities: a first-round ruff and the warning implicit in the bidding—and in the shape of South's hand—that normal distributions do not prevail (East or West may have a void). It is no crime to miss a slam when one's chance of making it is no better than 50%.—ED.

POINT'S PAUL
Sirs:
The future looks bright for the Black Knights of the Hudson under their new coach, Paul Dietzel (Pepsodent Paul at the Point, May 28). In time, the wins on the football field should have a big edge over the losses. Whatever kind of record is made, however, it seems to me that West Point has suffered a loss which no string of victories can make up for—a loss of integrity.

How the nation's Military Academy could bring itself to persuade a coach under contract at another school to break his solemn word to that school passes comprehension. Would even victory over Navy justify that kind of piracy?
EDWARD J. O'CONNOR, S.J.
Faculty Representative of Athletics, Xavier University
Cincinnati

Sirs:
Call him Pepsodent Paul or Phony Paul, he is a good coach and recruiter. But can any service academy recruit enough professional players?

Dietzel won the big ones and kept Johnny Vaught's Ole Miss from winning the national championship the past four years by scores of 14-0, 7-3, 6-6 and 10-7. Mr. Vaught was the happiest one to see Dietzel leave the SEC. If Dietzel can match this record against Navy starting in 1962, all Army fans will swear he parted the Hudson River. But if he loses three or four big ones only Paul will part.
TOM YOUNG
New Orleans

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)