WHERE THE GIRLS ARE

At times last week it seemed they were everywhere: on the courts at Wimbledon (all but the champ, who was dumped early); on the golf course at Myrtle Beach, working out a new pecking order; running and throwing in an international meet in Chicago. Results: happy times, some surprises
July 08, 1962

In other circumstances, like if she was a boy, the guffawing girl at right might have turned out to be a pretty fair shortstop. She began her athletic career at 10 as a member of a championship team in the Long Beach (Calif.) Recreation Park Softball League. But her parents thought baseball was unladylike, so Billie Jean Moffitt became a tennis player. Last week, at 18, she became for a brief moment THE tennis player: the unknown who in her first match knocked Australia's top-seeded Margaret Smith out of Wimbledon. It was the first opening-round upset of a top seed in the old tournament's history. Billie, who plays tennis with the comical tenacity of an office girl bucking for the boss's job, had an easy explanation: "When I was behind in the fourth set I thought, 'At least you've gone three sets.' Then I thought, 'That's stupid. You must win.' " And so she did.

IN SOUTH CAROLINA, AN UPSET IN THE RAIN

The country's best women golfers kicked up their spikes on soggy turf at their own National Open in Myrtle Beach. Surprise winner was 23-year-old professional Murle Lindstrom, who twists ecstatically (above) after chipping into the cup for a 64th-hole birdie and a lead she never gave up. Seattle's Jo Anne Gunderson (right) was the best amateur.

The established stars of the troupe, veterans like Mickey Wright, Louise Suggs and Betsy Rawls, were looking (and feeling) a bit frazzled at the tournament's end, but some new ones glittered brightly in the wetness. Shirley Englehorn (right), a pert, brisk 21-year-old brunette, overcame a first round 81 to finish sixth. Ruth Jessen (below), putting with her patented straddle stance, tied for second despite a stiff neck and a sore back.

A PRETTY POLE LOSES IN CHICAGO
Janina Bochucinska of Poland follows her javelin as it arcs through the air. It fell to earth 146 feet 5½ inches away, only good enough for third place in the two-day, U.S. Poland meet at the University of Chicago. Predictably, the American men beat the Poles (Al Oerter broke the world discus record) and, just as predictably, the Polish girls, aided by Janina's two points, topped the U.S. girls for the third time in a row.

PHOTOBRIAN SEED PHOTOJAMES DRAKE FOUR PHOTOS

HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
OUT
HOLE YARDS PAR R1 R2 R3 R4
IN
Eagle (-2)
Birdie (-1)
Bogey (+1)
Double Bogey (+2)